The Awesomer is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Learn more.

Awesome Learning

How a Pipe Organ Works

How a Pipe Organ Works

Organist Anna Lapwood provides an in-depth yet easy-to-understand explanation of how pipe organs work using the massive 3574-pipe organ at St John’s Smith Square in London. Along the way, you’ll learn about its pipes, wind chests, stops, pedals, and manuals, as well as hear some very different kinds of sounds it can produce.

The History of Pad Thai

The History of Pad Thai

With its mix of stir-fried noodles, protein, peanuts, veggies, and zesty condiments, pad thai is one delicious dish. Mental Floss series Food History delves into the relatively short history of the popular dish. While it was touted as Thailand’s national dish, its ingredients and origins came from other countries.

Advertisement

ByteBoi: DIY Advanced Game Console

The ByteBoi is a great way to learn about electronics and have fun doing it. The kit includes all the parts needed to build your own handheld gaming console and works with Make Code Arcade to create and load games. It’s also available with a complete tool kit for assembly.

Planetary Misconceptions

Planetary Misconceptions

Is Mercury the hottest planet? Is the Earth a perfect sphere? Does Uranus smell bad? Mental Floss host Justin Dodd takes us on a mission to space for a look at things you thought you knew about our solar system’s planets, and probably had wrong. The bottom line, most other planets sound like pretty miserable places to live.

The History of Gummy Bears

The History of Gummy Bears

We love us some gummy bears. There’s something so perfect about their chewy texture, fruity flavors, and adorable form that makes them special. Mental Floss series Food History looks back at the origins and evolution of the tasty candy treat, which first took their bear-shaped form in the 1920s in Germany.

How People Died in Different Eras

How People Died in Different Eras

These days, the leading causes of death in the U.S. are heart disease, cancer, and COVID-19. MinuteEarth explains the most common ways people perished around the globe in the past. While we’ve improved our life expectancy in many ways, there are still some long-standing killers we have yet to defeat.

Why Penrose Tiles Never Repeat

Why Penrose Tiles Never Repeat

Penrose tiles are a kind of arrangement in which polygons create patterns that never repeat. Minutephysics teamed up with Aatish Bhatia to explain the grid that underlies Penrose tiles and the math and geometry that prevents repetition. You can play with Penrose and similar patterns on Bhatia’s Pattern Collider.

The Slaver Ant Polyergus

The Slaver Ant Polyergus

Ants are fascinating creatures. While some may battle other colonies for supremacy, there are kinds of ants that enslave others. Kurzgesagt explains how Polyergus ants raid colonies and force their offspring to do their bidding until they die. They’ve become so reliant on their slaves that they can no longer care for themselves.

How Airport Codes Work

How Airport Codes Work

The airport code LAX stands for Los Angeles International, which makes sense. But why is Nashville International BNA? Or Newark International EWR? CGP Gray does his best to untangle the IATA three-letter naming conventions for airports around the globe and the further mess that the FAA made of US names.

Inside the Titanic

Inside the Titanic

Jared Owen has made some pretty amazing 3D illustrations to teach us how things work, but his digital model of the Titanic is the most awe-inspiring yet. This incredible video shows us virtually every detail of the ill-fated ship from the outside and in – deck-by-deck, and part-by-part.

Should You Really Count Calories?

Should You Really Count Calories?

When it comes to watching our diet, counting calories is one of the most common methods of tracking food intake. AsapSCIENCE explains how the nutritional composition of foods, our individual metabolisms, genetics, and microbiomes affect how we process food, impacting our health far more than calories alone.

The First Selfie

The First Selfie

People taking photos of themselves blew up with the advent of smartphones. But the first occurrence of what we now refer to as selfies happened way before the 21st century. Michael from Vsauce digs deep to unwind the origins and evolution of self-portraits in this informative history video.

The Fascinating History of Fonts

The Fascinating History of Fonts

After looking at the variety of fonts on his computer, vlogger and documentarian struthless wanted to know more about their origins. But as he started to pull at that thread, he learned so much more – about the history of written language, design, pop culture, and communication.

Advertisement

If Spiders Were as Big as Humans

If Spiders Were as Big as Humans

Are you an arachnophobe? Then run as far away from this video as you can. But if you can handle your spiders, then click play on What If’s creepy crawly clip that envisions a terrifying world in which our eight-legged friends are as big as us. Get ready for a big bowl of nope.

All About the Alpha Channel

All About the Alpha Channel

Digital images typically have three color channels – red, green, and blue, and sometimes a fourth, Alpha channel, which defines transparency. Captain Disillusion the ways they can be created, and how the improper use of the Alpha channel can mean the difference between a seamless composite image and disaster.

The Weird History of Monster Cereals

The Weird History of Monster Cereals

With Halloween upon us, there’s no better time to bust out a box of Count Chocula or Boo Berry. It’s part of a complete breakfast! Dan Larson of Toy Galaxy looks back at the strange and occasionally controversial history of General Mills’ spooky and sugary Monster Cereals, including the elusive Yummy Mummy.

Four Minute Books: Lifetime Subscription

Buy

Don’t have the time or attention span to read books? Four Minute Books is a modern-day spin on CliffsNotes, summarizing popular and useful books down to their most essential information. A subscription gives you access to more than 1000 book summaries and 1000 audio titles, plus 12 new titles each month.

If a Supervolcano Erupted

If a Supervolcano Erupted

What could be more terrifying than a regular volcano? A supervolcano, that’s what. Kurzgesagt explains how these massive ash, lava, and gas-spewing volcanoes form, and what sort of catastrophic consequences they might have on the Earth and its inhabitants for if the planet’s superheated insides erupted.

True Facts About Sea Cucumbers

True Facts About Sea Cucumbers

The Holothuroidea, aka sea cucumber, is one of the many strange-looking creatures that dwell at the bottom of the ocean. ZeFrank explains the unusual way these spiny, slug-like things reproduce, develop, and thrive – along with just how diverse their species can be. Expect Frank’s usual mix of information and innuendo.

How Lasers Engrave Metal

How Lasers Engrave Metal

With enough power, lasers can engrave and cut materials. In this video from WIRED, laser expert Alexander Sellite explains the physics at work as a fiber laser works its magic, vaporizing designs into sheet metal. By adjusting its scanning speed, pulse length, and power level, it can mark different metals and even create colors.

Advertisement

How Animals Get Their Scientific Names

How Animals Get Their Scientific Names

It’s been a while since we got a lesson from the Sam O’Nella Academy, but after a nearly 3-year hiatus from YouTube, the snarky educator takes us back to school to learn about scientific animal names and where they come from. Those taxonomy mnemonics are just as good as the ones on TV Funhouse.

The Most Extreme Places in the Universe

The Most Extreme Places in the Universe

The Universe is enormous. But here on earth, there’s a seemingly endless universe inhabited by insects, bacteria, plants, microorganisms, molecules, and atoms. Kurzgesagt zooms in beneath our feet for a journey to these tiny worlds among us, using the size of our world as a frame of reference.

How Candy Corn Became a Halloween Tradition

How Candy Corn Became a Halloween Tradition

Despite many people despising the fake, sugary flavor of candy corn, it’s still a wildly popular Halloween treat. Mental Floss explores the history of this divisive, tri-colored candy and why it’s so closely associated with the holiday. We never thought about it before, but candy corn has real corn in it, sorta.

What’s the Deal with Cardboard?

What’s the Deal with Cardboard?

In 2020, more than 120 billion pieces of cardboard were used to pack and ship items in the U.S. alone. It’s also one of the world’s most successfully recycled materials. New Mind digs into the history, science, and success of the ubiquitous corrugated paper material.

A Brief History of the Devil

A Brief History of the Devil

From his horns to his red suit to his pitchfork, we all have a pretty specific image in our minds of what The Devil looks like. In this TED-Ed video by educator and Episcopal priest Brian A. Pavlac, he delves into the origins of the ultimate evil dude and his various depictions over the years.

Cheating at Arcade Games with Science

Cheating at Arcade Games with Science

Mark Rober likes to use his engineering skills to help the little guy get a fair shake. After showing us how to improve our chances at carnival games, he built a series of portable devices that help him cheat and score the most at skill-based arcade games, and also shows us which ones are complete scams.

ADVERTISEMENT

Home | About | Suggest | Contact | Team | Links | Privacy | Disclosure
Advertise | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Sites We Like

Awesome Stuff: The Awesomer | Gadgets, Games & Geeks: Technabob | Cool Cars: 95Octane
Site Design & Content © 2008-2023 Awesomer Media / The Awesomer™
Visit our Friends at: Not Always Right