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Learning

Breaking Down Medical Scenes

Breaking Down Medical Scenes

WIRED continues its great series in which experts in their respective fields analyze scenes from TV shows and movies to evaluate their accuracy and likelihood in real life. Annie Onishi, a general surgery resident at Columbia University offers the play-by-play this time.

How Fireworks Shows Work

How Fireworks Shows Work

Each July, Pyro Spectactulars by Souza produces hundreds of fireworks shows to celebrate America’s Independence Day. Wired spent a little time with pyrotechnics expert Jim Souza to walk us through some of the science and magic behind the scenes of these explosive spectacles.

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Easy DIY Photo Filters

Easy DIY Photo Filters

Looking to add some interesting analog effects to your photography? COOPH’s handy tutorial video shows us eight ways to use common household items to create lens filters for any camera on the cheap. The plastic cutout ones are our favorites with their dreamy look.

25 Chemistry Experiments in 15 Minutes

25 Chemistry Experiments in 15 Minutes

“Chemistry for all!” Dr. Andrew Z. Szydło is a chemistry teacher. He has what TED Talks calls a “pyrotechnical” approach to teaching. Watch him illustrate the basics of chemistry and the most important discoveries by racing through numerous experiments during his lecture.

Can You Die From Too Much Pleasure?

Can You Die From Too Much Pleasure?

We all want to have a good time, but as this clip from The Infographics Show reminds us, our brains’ reward system can cause us to seek out too much of a good thing sometimes – whether through addiction, thrill seeking, or other compulsive behaviors.

Why There Are Many Types of Screws

Why There Are Many Types of Screws

Real Engineering talks about the history of screws to explain why there are so many kinds of them these days. Initially, various screw heads arose to improve upon previous designs. However, starting in the 20th century, different heads were made to stop consumers from fiddling with products.

Brilliant Fictional Movie Cars

Brilliant Fictional Movie Cars

For its list of the 10 best movie cars, Drivetribe chose only cars that were either custom-made from the ground up or ones so heavily modified that they’re practically new models. So you won’t find the DeLorean or the Ecto-1 here, making it a more esoteric roundup.

What If Oxygen Doubled

What If Oxygen Doubled

Our bodies, brains, and blood cells thrive on oxygen, and inhaling a little extra is good for an energy boost. But is there such a thing as too much of a good thing? What If explores the hypothetical of what might happen if the Earth’s atmosphere had twice as much o2.

Is Meat Bad for You?

Is Meat Bad for You?

You might think that mammals always ate meat, but it turns out it was an evolutionary necessity due to changes in Earth’s climate. Kurzgesagt explores whether or not this change in our diets was actually good for us, or if eating meat truly has a negative impact on our health.

The Best/Worst Torture

The Best/Worst Torture

(PG-13: Gross, Language) CollegeHumor’s Dropout TV series What the F 101 looks at one of the stranger types of torture. “The Boats” started out rather pleasantly with a delicious serving of milk and honey, but it quickly takes a turn for the worse.

CD / Interlacing

CD / Interlacing

Captain Disillusion’s latest lesson on video technology delves into why signals used to be split up into alternating fields and then reconstructed on the fly. We no longer need to use interlacing, but it was a cool solution to a challenging engineering problem.

Animals in Space

Animals in Space

(PG-13: Language) There’s a long, and often disturbing history of launching animals into the cosmos before space programs felt comfortable sending humans. Sam O’Nella Academy looks back at the creatures who often gave their lives so that space exploration could march forward.

Tips for Falling Asleep

Tips for Falling Asleep

AsapScience shares a number of tips that you can follow to help you fall asleep. Most of them involve do’s and don’t’s before bedtime, such as taking a hot shower or avoiding caffeine, but the most important tips are to keep yourself cool and relaxed, and to have consistent sleep times.

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How Daft Punk Brought Back Disco

How Daft Punk Brought Back Disco

Polyphonic talks about the history of disco and how Daft Punk made it cool again with their album Random Access Memories. By pairing up with disco legends and highlighting the genre’s key features, the robots made disco hit after disco hit in one release.

Africa’s City in the Sea

Africa’s City in the Sea

The B1M shares details about the construction of Eko Atlantic, a city being built on reclaimed land off the coast of Lagos, Nigeria. It required the construction of a seawall built to withstand waves and storms, and will house 250,000 residents and 150,000 commuters when complete.

Terraforming the Sahara Desert

Terraforming the Sahara Desert

If possible, replacing the barren land of the Sahara Desert with a lush forest could theoretically result in a big win in the fight against climate change, even though it would be a monumental project. But What If stipulates that doing it could create more problems than it would solve.

The Engineering of Droplets

The Engineering of Droplets

The Engineer Guy explains how droplets form. It happens when fluid is allowed to drip such that it takes a form with the smallest surface area – a sphere. By vibrating the fluid’s container, one can control how fast droplets form. This knowledge is used in printing, painting, and even medical applications.

NASA: We Are Going

NASA: We Are Going

NASA enlisted the help of William Shatner to narrate this confident video about the space agency’s plan to go back to the Moon and establish a base of operations there by 2024. If successful, the project will serve as a launchpad for deeper space exploration.

Facts about the Human Body

Facts about the Human Body

Did you know that humans are the only animals with chins? Or that the bones in our hands and feet account for half the bones in our body? What about the fact that we glow? Learn all that and more in Mental Floss’ List Show.

How Sound Works in Rooms

How Sound Works in Rooms

Ever wonder why the sound echoes in an enclosed room? This 2013 clip from Acoustic Geometry, demonstrates some of the key principles of direct and reflected sounds using a combination of NERF disc guns, moiré patterns, and more than 1100 feet of fluorescent string.

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The Science of Pain

The Science of Pain

There are few things in life that are worse than suffering from severe pain. But as this clip from TED-Ed points out, our sense of pain can act in some truly mysterious ways, sometimes even triggering solely from thinking that we’re injured.

Engineering Product Sounds

Engineering Product Sounds

Did you know that vacuum cleaners don’t actually need to be as loud as they are? Cheddar explains how companies often manipulate the sounds their products make to make them more satisfying, to provide feedback, and to demonstrate that they are actually doing their job.

Former CIA on Spies in Films & TV

Former CIA on Spies in Films & TV

Jonna Mendez used to be the Chief of Disguise at CIA. She sat down with Wired to look at the right and wrong ways spies behave in movies and TV shows, particularly regarding how they disguise themselves, as well as the tools they use to conceal their identities.

CD / Resolution

CD / Resolution

As part of his informative series on computer graphics and visual effects, Captain Disillusion provides a great layperson’s lesson on the fundamentals of pixels and image resolution. As the resolution war escalates, are we already at the point of diminishing returns?

Why Produce Used to Suck

Why Produce Used to Suck

These days, most of the fruits and veggies we buy at the grocery store are quite good. Sam O’Nella Academy looks back at how we got from produce that was hard to eat, lacking in edible bits, and downright weird, to produce that we discard simply for aesthetic reasons.

The World’s Fastest Elevators

The World’s Fastest Elevators

The Shanghai Tower is “only” the world’s second tallest building. But it has other bragging rights. It has the world’s fastest elevators – three of them, in fact – capable of going 40mph, enough to go from the first to the 121st floor in just 55 seconds.

Hitboxes in Video Games

Hitboxes in Video Games

(PG-13: Language) Hitboxes are invisible but defined areas that are often used in video games to detect a collision. They are mostly used in attack animations in fighting games and shooters. The Score esports shares how getting hitboxes wrong can rig or ruin a game.

NASA AR Notebook

NASA AR Notebook
$30  Buy Comment

AstroReality celebrates NASA’s 60th Anniversary with an augmented reality gift set, which includes this beautiful notebook. Available with a white or gray cover, the notebook has a few pages that feature animation and enhanced content when viewed with AstroReality’s mobile app.

Ordinary Things: Treadmills

Ordinary Things: Treadmills

“In 1818, civil engineer William Cubbitt designed the first treadmill as a device to punish inmates…” Learn this and everything else you never wanted to know about treadmills, as explained by an ordinary guy in the compelling new web series Ordinary Things. Then learn about pillows, stairs, and onions too.

How to Spot a Fake

How to Spot a Fake

WIRED sat down with forensic scientist Thiago Piwowarczyk and art historian Jeffrey Taylor PhD to get the inside skinny on ways that science and a skilled eye can help detect art forgeries. Abstract works like Jackson Pollock’s drips and splashes are especially challenging.

Why Animals Swarm

Why Animals Swarm

Have you ever wondered why insects, birds, fish, and bats gather together into huge and coordinated groups? TED-Ed’s Maria R. D’Orsogna explores the fascinating science behind this behavior, which drives many species as a method of survival and group productivity.

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