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The Science of Parkour

The Science of Parkour

Between the risks of injury and the often precarious locations, parkour and freerunning can be pretty exciting to watch. SciShow goes beyond the athleticism to the physics of the sport, digging into the things that need to happen mechanically in order to climb walls, vault over obstacles, and land without trauma.

Why Are Cat Claws So Sharp?

Why Are Cat Claws So Sharp?

If you’ve ever gotten gored by your adorable little kitty cat’s hook-like claws, you know how sharp they can be. Science educator Kyle Hill explains the biology behind cat claws, what makes them different from our fingernails, and how they manage to stay so razor-sharp.

How Large Can a Bacteria Get?

How Large Can a Bacteria Get?

Each of our bodies is teeming with trillions of bacteria at any given moment. Thankfully, these microscopic organisms generally work in harmony with our cells. But how did evolution prevent bacteria from becoming as big as a whale? Kurzgesagt explores this question in the latest episode of their Life & Size series.

Middle Ages Misconceptions

Middle Ages Misconceptions

You might assume that most people in the middle ages thought the earth was flat, but it turns out many of them already knew the earth was round. Mental Floss host Justin Dodd explores this misconception and a few others about medieval times.

Hexagons are the Bestagons

Hexagons are the Bestagons

We all know that bees make their honeycombs by creating nearly perfect hexagonal cells. But why is that they chose hexagons to do their building? CGP Grey looks into the power and strength of this basic six-sided form, especially when it comes to tiling efficiency.

Ronald McDonald: A Life

Ronald McDonald: A Life

(PG-13: Language) For decades, Ronald McDonald was one of the world’s most recognized brand mascots. But something happened when 2016 hit, and the once-ubiquitous character all but vanished from the scene. Ordinary Things recalls the history of the burger clown, from his creepy early beginnings to his eventual downfall.

How Candy Corn Became a Halloween Tradition

How Candy Corn Became a Halloween Tradition

Despite many people despising the fake, sugary flavor of candy corn, it’s still a wildly popular Halloween treat. Mental Floss explores the history of this divisive, tri-colored candy and why it’s so closely associated with the holiday. We never thought about it before, but candy corn has real corn in it, sorta.

The Caproni CA-60 Transaereo

The Caproni CA-60 Transaereo

With eight engines, nine wings, and room for 100 passengers, this early 20th-century flying machine was designed to be the first mass-passenger aircraft capable of transatlantic flight. Mustard looks back at the history of this unusual airplane, and what ended up being its downfall.

Abandoned: S.S America

Abandoned: S.S America

Christened in 1940, the S.S. America was a glorious oceanliner that could carry 1200 passengers in luxurious surroundings. But a series of events led the vessel to eventually being abandoned and becoming a rusted-out shipwreck. Bright Sun Films looks back at the unfortunate history of this once-impressive cruise ship.

Everything Is Chemical

Everything Is Chemical

Every living thing on Earth is made up of mix of chemical elements, including carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. This animated short from NM State University’s Learning Games Lab provides a laypersons’ explanation of how chemical bonds create life and provide the nutrients needed to keep it going.

Why Canada Doesn’t Have Their Own Car Brands

Why Canada Doesn’t Have Their Own Car Brands

There are a number of great American cars manufactured in Canada. In total, our neighbors to the North produced 2.4 million cars in 2019 alone. But for some reason, Canada no longer has any of its own major car brands. Donut Media digs into this puzzling question and attempts to provide some answers.

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The Earth in One Day

The Earth in One Day

Imagine, if you will, that the entire 4.5 billion year history of the Earth was collapsed down to a 24-hour single day. Bright Side’s educational video does just that, taking significant events in the development of our world and giving us a relative sense of how closely together they played out.

Do the Past and Future Exist?

Do the Past and Future Exist?

Ready to have your mind blown? In much the same way as a Christopher Nolan movie, PBS Space Time host Matt O’Dowd is here to mess with our understandings about time, as he explores theories that look at the relationships between the past, the present, and the future.

How Old Is Sunlight?

How Old Is Sunlight?

The speed of light is pretty darned fast, but given just how far the Earth is away from the Sun, its light doesn’t get here instantly. It’s Okay to Be Smart teaches us how it’s not just a simple math equation, but complex astrophysics explain how sunlight is much older than you’d think.

Is Gravity an Illusion?

Is Gravity an Illusion?

Howdy, folks! It’s science time! Veritasium explains how gravity isn’t a force according to the General Theory of Relativity. He then demonstrates how the way we are moving through space-time while standing on Earth isn’t really any different from what an astronaut experiences as their rocket accelerates through space.

When Time Became History

When Time Became History

To celebrate the release of their Human Era Calendar for the year 12,021, Kurzgesagt looks to the distant future to imagine what it might be like for future archeologists as they attempt to reconstruct our present, along with the challenges we face figuring out our past.

Knots You Need to Know

Knots You Need to Know

Don’t have your knot-tying merit badge? No worries. InnerBark Outdoors shows us seven knots that are easy to learn but are very useful. With the exception of one, all of these knots are not come in handy outdoors or when boating, but also at home.

What the #[email protected]!% Are These?

What the #$@!% Are These?

While we’re perfectly content to use actual swear words, for many years, they’ve been off-limits for use in most public-facing entertainment. Vox looks back at how random punctuation marks became the universal symbol for so-called “obscene” words.

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When Rodents Had Horns

When Rodents Had Horns

Despite the massive number of rodents alive today, none of them have horns. But millions of years ago, some did. The so-called “horned gopher” had a pair of bony protrusions on its head, making it look pretty silly if you ask us. PBS Eons explains their purpose, and how they might still be useful if rodents had them today.

Why People Fall for Misinformation

Why People Fall for Misinformation

It seems that distorted information and falsehoods are more common than the truth these days. But why is it that humans fall for such misleading information? TED-Ed speaker Joseph Isaac looks at one specific case where something treated as fact has been widely believed, despite the facts saying otherwise.

How Do Potholes Work?

How Do Potholes Work?

Potholed roads can be a major annoyance, or in severe cases, they can cause vehicle damage or accidents. Why is it that with all of the advancements in materials science, we still get roads with giant divots? Grady Hillhouse of Practical Engineering explains the uphill battle faced by transportation departments around the globe.

The Mighty Weaver Ant

The Mighty Weaver Ant

Kurzgesagt introduces us to the oecophylla weaver ant. These long-legged insects dwell in tropical jungles, building incredible colonies that spread upwards and sideways between trees. They’re not only incredibly industrious, they’re fierce warriors and defenders of their kingdoms.

Did Cavemen Ever Really Exist?

Did Cavemen Ever Really Exist?

We all have a pretty specific image in mind when someone says “caveman.” But did these thick-browed, cave-dwelling early humans exist, or is this just a caricature created by popular culture? Today I Found Out digs into what we now know about the Stone Age, and how closely it matches up with these stereotypes.

CD / Color

CD / Color

Captain Disillusion is back with another one of his great educational videos about imaging technology and terminology. This time, he explains how our brains and eyes perceive color, and how computers can be used to manipulate hue, saturation, and brightness to our every whim.

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