Awesome Learning

The History of Pretzels

The History of Pretzels

Now that we know about the history of mustard, it’s time to learn about one of its companion foods. Mental Floss’ Food History is here to explain where the first pretzels came from, how they evolved from a religious food into the popular snack we know and love today, and why we have both soft and hard versions.

How to Change

How to Change

Let’s face it. Change is hard. Even if you have solid goals and desires, you might find it difficult to adapt your behaviors to get there. Kurzgesagt explains the physiological reasons that make it hard to change and some practical advice on how to break through when you’re stuck in a rut.

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The World’s Strangest Time Zones

The World’s Strangest Time Zones

In a perfect world, we would have 24 even divisions for our time zones. But as RealLifeLore points out, political agendas and the dreaded daylight saving time have created weird partitions that can theoretically lead to some crazy watch adjustments.

What Causes Phantom Traffic Jams?

What Causes Phantom Traffic Jams?

So you’re cruising down the highway, when all of a sudden you’re in a traffic jam. But there are no accidents, construction, or other emergency activity, so why does this happen? TED-Ed explores the phenomenon known as a “phantom traffic jam,” what makes them happen, and how we might minimize their occurence.

How They Test Roads

How They Test Roads

When automakers want to test cars for longevity, they put them on rollers and shakers to simulate long-term driving. But how do you test how long roads last? Tom Scott takes us to a pavement testing facility in France that uses a rapidly spinning machine called a fatigue carousel to rapidly imitate decades of road use.

Why Dark Video Sucks

Why Dark Video Sucks

It doesn’t matter if you’ve got the most expensive display you can buy, gradients of color in dark scenes often look like a blocky mess. Tom Scott offers a great explanation of the technological limitations that cause these issues, and the visual mechanisms that make them less noticeable in brighter scenes.

Grasp It Structural Engineering Training System

Grasp It Structural Engineering Training System

This interactive educational system helps students learn about the physical properties of structures. It combines a set of beams, levers, pivot points, and other parts that attach to a backboard which work in concert with augmented reality projections to show the physics at play when forces are applied.

Why Do Electric Plugs Have Holes?

Why Do Electric Plugs Have Holes?

The reason that electric plugs typically have two or three metal prongs is very easy to explain. But what about those holes you see in the tips of the prongs? Silver Cymbal digs into the backstory and purpose of this mysterious design attribute and shines some light on the topic.

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Why Avocados Shouldn’t Exist

Why Avocados Shouldn’t Exist

Whether on a sammie with bacon, chicken and cheese, or in a spicy guac, we delight in our delicious avocados. But this tasty and nutritious natural treat might not even exist today if it weren’t for some prehistoric farmers who saved them from extinction. SciShow explains.

Facts About Time

Facts About Time

Time isn’t as simple as what shows up on your phone’s screen. Erin McCarthy of Mental Floss offers up a number of interesting tidbits about the nature of time, how humans perceive its passage, how space and time relate, and the different ways of measuring time itself.

Disney Parks’ Forced Perspective Illusions

Disney Parks’ Forced Perspective Illusions

If you’ve ever visited one of Disney’s theme parks, you have been tricked. The parks frequently employ an optical illusion known as forced perspective to make structures look bigger or smaller than they actually are. Art of Engineering explains the trickery and why our brains get so easily fooled by it.

The Earth in One Day

The Earth in One Day

Imagine, if you will, that the entire 4.5 billion year history of the Earth was collapsed down to a 24-hour single day. Bright Side’s educational video does just that, taking significant events in the development of our world and giving us a relative sense of how closely together they played out.

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2022 Facebook Marketing Expert Bundle

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Learn to get the most out of Facebook with this series of 11 online courses from The Awesomer Shop. Among the lessons, you’ll learn about building and engaging an audience, creating Facebook ads and boosted posts that perform, and using Facebook Messenger as a marketing tool.

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Want to get in on the cryptocurrency movement, but don’t understand how it all works? This series of nine courses will teach you the basics of Bitcoin, Stablecoin, Steemit, and other cryptocurrencies, along with digital wallets, trading, and how to make money by investing NFTs or by blogging and posting to social media.

The History of Gummy Bears

The History of Gummy Bears

We love us some gummy bears. There’s something so perfect about their chewy texture, fruity flavors, and adorable form that makes them special. Mental Floss series Food History looks back at the origins and evolution of the tasty candy treat, which first took their bear-shaped form in the 1920s in Germany.

Why Circuit Boards Are Green

Why Circuit Boards Are Green

With their green and copper color scheme, circuit boards have a distinctive look. It turns out that there’s a good reason that so many of them are the same color. Today I Found Out offers an in-depth explanation of how circuit boards are made, what they’re made from, and why they look like they do.

What’s the Deal with Cardboard?

What’s the Deal with Cardboard?

In 2020, more than 120 billion pieces of cardboard were used to pack and ship items in the U.S. alone. It’s also one of the world’s most successfully recycled materials. New Mind digs into the history, science, and success of the ubiquitous corrugated paper material.

The History of the English Language

The History of the English Language

English is one of the many Indo-European languages spoken in many parts of the world. Harrison Holt of The Generalist Papers looks at how our language evolved dramatically over the centuries and how it’s related to languages like German, Dutch, and Swedish.

Why Cooper Black Is Everywhere

Why Cooper Black Is Everywhere

The font Cooper Black dates all the way back to 1922, and over its century in use has appeared everywhere from David Bowie albums to ramen noodles, to signs for neighborhood businesses. Vox digs into the history of this playful, yet legible serif typeface, and why it became so popular.

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Is Gravity an Illusion?

Is Gravity an Illusion?

Howdy, folks! It’s science time! Veritasium explains how gravity isn’t a force according to the General Theory of Relativity. He then demonstrates how the way we are moving through space-time while standing on Earth isn’t really any different from what an astronaut experiences as their rocket accelerates through space.

How U.S. Interstate Numbers Work

How U.S. Interstate Numbers Work

When the U.S. started creating highways connecting the nation, interstates were identified with a logical numbering scheme. CGP Grey looks back at the rationale behind the numbers which have since become cluttered with intrastate interstates, bypasses, beltways, spurs, and exception cases to confuse matters.

The Science + Technology of Modern Bowling

The Science + Technology of Modern Bowling

Bowling has been around in one form or another for roughly 7000 years. Veritasium explores some of the significant technological advancements that the seemingly simple sport has experienced in the last few decades, along with the physics at play in the design of bowling balls, pins, and alleys.

What Exactly Is “Normal” Anyhow?

What Exactly Is “Normal” Anyhow?

Narrow-minded people often call others out for not being normal. But is anyone really normal or typical? This TED-Ed lesson by Yana Buhrer Tavanier explores the history of the term and how its misuse has had a tremendously negative impact on society. Animated by Eoin Duffy.

No-Nails Survival Shelter

No-Nails Survival Shelter

We may take the roof over our head for granted these days, but in the 18th century, families venturing into the interior of North America had to build their own shelters to survive the elements as they headed westward. Frontier lifestyle expert Jon Townsend shows us how they might have constructed a shelter without any nails.

Every Video Is an Illusion

Every Video Is an Illusion

Videos and film images aren’t moving at all. They’re just a collection of back-to-back frames that our brains stitch together to create the illusion of movement. Joe Hanson of the PBS series Be Smart takes a deep dive into the way that our eyes and minds process images and how motion picture devices work.

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