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Biking up Stairs

Biking up Stairs

Riding a bicycle down stairs isn’t that difficult as long as you watch your weight transfer. But Mike Boyd wanted to figure out how to get his mountain bike UP a flight of stairs without getting off. Like most things Mike sets his mind to, he eventually figured it out, though we’re sure his legs were burning after this lesson.

Learn to Work from Anywhere

2020 has been quite the year, forcing many of us to avoid the office and attempt to work from home. This series of online courses is designed to help you boost your productivity and focus, with training on time management, communication skills, and other techniques that can help you work wherever life takes you.

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How the Space Shuttle Worked

How the Space Shuttle Worked

Despite its two tragic missions, with 135 launches to its credit, the Space Shuttle was arguably the most successful space program of all time. 3D animator Jared Owen explains how shuttle missions worked, along with an in-depth look at the orbiter, where astronauts spent their time throughout their journeys.

What If We Didn’t Need Sleep

What If We Didn’t Need Sleep

We’ve pulled our share of all-nighters over the years, but have drawn the line somewhere around 36 hours without sleep. But the What If channel explores what life might be like if sleep weren’t a necessity for our brains and bodies. It turns out having all that extra time would have sweeping implications, both good and bad.

eBook Self-Publishing Bundle

Want to publish your creative writing? This series of online courses will help you take your craft to another level, with training in good writing habits, story structure, software tools for writers, and how to get your books distributed onto Amazon’s popular Kindle eBook reader. Another great deal from The Awesomer Shop.

The Biggest Numbers

The Biggest Numbers

Millions, billions, trillions, quadrillions, septillions… these kind of large numbers are really hard to wrap your mind around. The guys at Riddle attempt to put some of these numbers in perspective using real world examples of things that occur in such quantities.

The Empty $161 Billion City

The Empty $161 Billion City

China has spent billions of dollars building the Kangbashi District of Ordos City. The city has housing for a million people, a modern infrastructure, and everything you could ask for. Half as Interesting explains why the giant city in the desert is still only at 1/5th of its planned population, 10 years after completion.

The History of Ketchup and Mustard

The History of Ketchup and Mustard

Ketchup and mustard go hand-in-hand, but they both have very different origins, separated by hundreds of years and thousands of miles. Mental Floss provides a brief history of the popular condiments. While early mustards were similar to today’s, the first ketchups had more in common with fish sauce.

The Great Stink of 1858

The Great Stink of 1858

After years of piling up garbage and other nasty waste in London, England, the city was overwhelmed with a horrific stench. Weird History looks back at this terribly nasty part of the 19th century, and how it led to major improvements in the city’s hygiene and waste disposal infrastructure.

What Is Intelligence?

What Is Intelligence?

While humans might make some really stupid decisions, we’re still considered intelligent beings. Kurzgesagt explores what attributes make a living creature intelligent. While some basic organisms demonstrate capabilities that appear to be thoughtful, more complex brains are required for complex problem solving.

Which Planet is Closest?

Which Planet is Closest?

We all learned the positions of the planets from some chart on the wall in grade school. But as CGP Grey reminds us, planets rotate in elliptical orbits at varying speeds around the sun, meaning that the answer isn’t quite as simple as you thought – depending on the question you’re actually asking.

Why Are You Alive?

Why Are You Alive?

Even when you’re sound asleep, there are billions of processes going on inside of your body. Kurzgesagt explores the forces, energy sources, and organic compounds at work that keep us alive and ticking, despite the universe’s tendency towards entropy.

Everything is a Remix: Reality

Everything is a Remix: Reality

“How can we prevent ourselves from getting lost in the funhouse?” Filmmaker and speaker Kirby Ferguson looks at how the barrage of social media and other information sources can affect our perception of what is real, and how you can use your instincts and critical thinking to reduce your chances of being manipulated.

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Humble Circuits & Electronics Bundle

Humble Circuits & Electronics Bundle

This Humble Bundle is packed with over $1000 worth of reading material from Morgan & Claypool to help you learn about electronic circuits, microcontrollers, and engineering principles. Pay what you want, and if you spend more than $15, you’ll get all 17 e-Books, while supporting the National Coalition Against Censorship.

NASA’s Guide to Black Hole Safety

NASA’s Guide to Black Hole Safety

After seeing the Disney flick The Black Hole, we already were pretty cautious about visiting such an astrophysics phenomenon. But this clip from NASA Goddard provides significantly more scientific reasons you’d never want to get close to one.

Why Is American Breakfast Sweet?

Why Is American Breakfast Sweet?

Breakfast in most other countries isn’t as packed with sugar as it is here in the U.S. So how is it that America ended up eating desserts for breakfast, and is it really the most important meal of the day? Journalist Johnny Harris digs into the story and offers his thoughts on our bad morning eating habits.

Why Is Water So Weird?

Why Is Water So Weird?

Despite being one of the most common (and lifegiving) chemicals on Earth, water behaves in ways that it probably shouldn’t. This clip from Seeker dives into the deep end of the ocean as it explains some of the strange properties of H2O, and why scientists are still learning things about this theoretically simple compound.

How Escalators Work

How Escalators Work

As long as we’re not carrying a heavy suitcase, we generally take the stairs when given a choice. But for those times when you feel like giving your legs a break, the escalator is quite the invention. Jared Owen provides an animated explanation of the inner workings of this engineering marvel that dates back to the mid-19th century.

Facts About Farts

Facts About Farts

Flatulation is one of those rare forces of nature that’s both essential and the source of endless giggles. From the first fart joke ever told to the composition of your flatus, Mental Floss editor Erin McCarthy is here to school us on the finer points of our bodies’ gaseous emissions.

Why Cooper Black Is Everywhere

Why Cooper Black Is Everywhere

The font Cooper Black dates all the way back to 1922, and over its century in use has appeared everywhere from David Bowie albums to ramen noodles, to signs for neighborhood businesses. Vox digs into the history of this playful, yet legible serif typeface, and why it became so popular.

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The World’s Largest Truck Stop

The World’s Largest Truck Stop

Off the Cuf’s video not only takes us on a tour of the enormous Iowa 80 Truck Stop, it spends a good bit of time delving into the history of trucking goods across America, and the importance of this critical industry in delivering food and other items that we rely on every day.

Turbulent Flow Is Awesome

Turbulent Flow Is Awesome

After watching one of Smarter Every Days‘ videos about the unique beauty of laminar flow, Derek Muller of Veritasium wanted to explore a much trickier kind of physics. When air, fluids, and gases experience turbulence, their chaos may be hard to explain and model, but it’s pretty amazing stuff when you dive in deep.

Solar Storms vs. Civilization

Solar Storms vs. Civilization

Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are frequent occurrences on the Sun. Some have been known to disrupt radio waves, but could they actually cause damage? Kurzgesagt stares directly into the Sun to educate us on solar storms, why they occur, and if a strong enough super storm could actually wipe out civilization.

In the Next 60 Seconds

In the Next 60 Seconds

The human body is an amazing organic machine that performs countless tasks every minute of every day. In this video from The Infographics Show, they tally up some of the things that your body will do in the next minute – or twice as much while you watch the entire 2 minute clip.

Costume Design 101

Costume Design 101

Film Radar made this great video about wardrobe design in film and TV. Good costume designers inhabit the minds of both the characters and the director. In terms of production, costumes are often custom made, even for extras, and may have multiple replicas.

What Causes Phantom Traffic Jams?

What Causes Phantom Traffic Jams?

So you’re cruising down the highway, when all of a sudden you’re in a traffic jam. But there are no accidents, construction, or other emergency activity, so why does this happen? TED-Ed explores the phenomenon known as a “phantom traffic jam,” what makes them happen, and how we might minimize their occurence.

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