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The First Video Game

The First Video Game

Ahoy presents an incredibly in-depth analysis of the origins of video games, swiftly debunking any confusion that Pong was the first video game ever, and looking back at early titles like Computer Space, SpaceWar!, Tennis for Two, and their programmers. Turns out hunting down the very first video game isn’t that simple.

If You Jumped Into Stomach Acid

If You Jumped Into Stomach Acid

The What If channel likes to imagine some pretty gory hypotheticals, but this one takes the cake so far, as they envision what might happen to our bodies if we were to jump into a swimming pool filled with stomach acid. TL;DW: just get out of there and hose off quick.

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Why Animals Swarm

Why Animals Swarm

Have you ever wondered why insects, birds, fish, and bats gather together into huge and coordinated groups? TED-Ed’s Maria R. D’Orsogna explores the fascinating science behind this behavior, which drives many species as a method of survival and group productivity.

True Facts: The Ogre-Faced Spider

True Facts: The Ogre-Faced Spider

Nature show host Zefrank1 is here to educate us on the Deinopis, also known as the “ogre-faced” spider. This creepy crawler has big beady eyes that see better than your best camera lens, and creates a stretchy net she holds between her legs to ensnare and cocoon her prey.

Learn Languages with Mondly

Learn new languages quickly and easily with Mondly. The mobile app uses speech recognition tech to help you train your pronunciations, and lets you take part in virtual conversations. There are 33 languages to choose from, and you can grab a 1-, 3-, or 5-language lifetime subscription in The Awesomer Shop.

Ordinary Things: The Moon

Ordinary Things: The Moon

The Ordinary Guy provides an amusing and informative lesson on where the Moon came from, its roles in society, pop culture, politics, and more. From philosophers, to scientists, to religions, to governments, to conspiracy theorists, the Moon has fascinated humans for as long as they could look up into the sky.

4 Ominous Notes

4 Ominous Notes

There’s a four-note melody which has found its way into numerous films, often at a moment when a character dies, or is in grave peril. Vox explores the origins of this ominous music, known as Dies Irae, which dates back to the 13th century.

12min Micro Book Library

Expand your mind every day with this app that offers up new content 30 times a month. Each of its non-fiction micro books is designed to be read or listened to in less than 12-minutes, making it a perfect complement to your daily commute or your lunch break. Grab a lifetime subscription in The Awesomer Shop.

The Truth About Vinyl Records

The Truth About Vinyl Records

Real Engineering explains the history of vinyl records, how they are made and how they work. In doing so, we learn that they are in no scientifically-demonstrable way superior to digital music. That said, the tangible and simple nature of vinyl still holds an appeal.

Why Exercise Is Hard

Why Exercise Is Hard

Exercise is important to our health and long-term survival. So why is it that our genetic programming doesn’t make it something that we instinctively crave? MinuteEarth explores how evolution may have affected our feelings about working out and being active.

How Dr. Martens Are Made

How Dr. Martens Are Made

Insider visited Dr. Martens’ only shoe factory in the UK to give us a peek at how the company makes its famously tough-as-nails shoes and boots. The factory employs 50 people, who make about 100,000 pairs every year.

Designing the Perfect Runway

Designing the Perfect Runway

While most airports have designed their runways to take advantage of wind patterns, some have less than optimal layouts for efficiency and safety. Real Engineering takes out a clean sheet of paper to explain what he thinks the ideal runway setup might look like.

If Pangea Never Broke Apart

If Pangea Never Broke Apart

For those of you who were sleeping in class that day, before the earth broke into continents, about 1/3rd of our planet was covered with a landmass known as Pangea. What If attempts to deduce what life might be like if we could still drive from Chicago to Paris, and assuming that we actually evolved to become what we are.

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T-Rex’s Tiny Arms

T-Rex’s Tiny Arms

It’s easy to make fun of T-Rex’s comically short arms, but clearly there must have been some reason this killer dino was saddled with such awkward appendages. MinuteEarth explores this seemingly odd trait, and some possible evolutionary explanations.

Why Exhaust Notes Sound Different

Why Exhaust Notes Sound Different

Whether you love the flat-plane V8 grunt of a Shelby GT350, the snaps and crackles of a Jaguar F-Type, the whirr of a Porsche 911, or the brapp of a Mazda RX-7, every car makes a different sound. But as Donut Media explains, it’s way more than the pipes and mufflers that make a car’s exhaust note sound the way it does.

Why LEGO Bricks Hurt

Why LEGO Bricks Hurt

If you’ve ever found your bare feet on the wrong side of a LEGO brick, you know how painful the feeling can be. Today I Found Out explores one of life’s many imponderables, and explores how something so small and innocuous can be so distressing.

What Not to Do in Japan

What Not to Do in Japan

(PG-13: Language) British expat Chris Broad has been living in Japan for a while now, and has some pointers for things you never should do while in the country. It’s a humorous, but very useful look at Japanese manners and decorum. TL;DW: Don’t play with your chopsticks.

One Building, 285,000 Businesses

One Building, 285,000 Businesses

You’d think it would be impossible to fit over 285,000 businesses into a single building, but you’d be wrong. In order to reduce their tax burden, tons of US companies are incorporated in Delaware. Half as Interesting explains this giant tax loophole and how so many businesses share the same address.

Journey to the Microcosmos

Journey to the Microcosmos

This new channel is a collaboration by SciShow host Hank Green, musician Andrew Huang, and microorganism enthusiast James Weiss. It delves deep into the world of the trillions of microscopic organisms that surround us. We recommend starting off with Meet the Microcosmos for a primer to this fascinating universe.

The Dinosaur Tier List

The Dinosaur Tier List

Given the tremendous diversity of their shapes, sizes, and abilities, it’s no wonder that TierZoo’s in-depth evaluation of dinosaurs clocks in at over 15 minutes. While you’d think that T. Rex was the absolute king of the heap, you’d be wrong.

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I’m Not a Robot

I’m Not a Robot

Spam has always been a big problem on the Internet. Tom Scott looks back at the history of CAPTCHA and other solutions attempted over the years to weed out bots from humans submitting forms, and the endless game of cat and mouse which is being fought on the digital battlefield.

Why Some Days Aren’t 24 Hours

Why Some Days Aren’t 24 Hours

If you ever had to explain the Earth’s timekeeping method to an alien civilization, you might find it challenging. As Minute Physics explains, what we call a day isn’t exactly what most of us think. For a more detailed explanation, the What Is a Day interactive lab is worth checking out.

What If You Only Drank Coke?

What If You Only Drank Coke?

Sugar is a drug. It satisfies cravings, is addictive, and bad for you. But what would happen if you lost your mind and the only thing you drank for the rest of your life was sugary (er, high fructose corn sweenter-y) soda pop? The Infographics Show digs into what is sure to be a terrible idea.

Do Robots Deserve Rights?

Do Robots Deserve Rights?

Kurzgesagt asks some of the most difficult questions that will become exponentially more relevant in the years to come. Do robots deserve rights? Would they even need or want the same rights that humans have?

Startup Master Class Bundle

Get the most out of your small business with this series of eight online courses, covering everything from business development, to raising capital, to leveraging Amazon’s powerful fulfillment channels, to maximizing value should you ever sell. Another great E-Learning deal in The Awesomer Shop.

If You Fell out of an Airplane

If You Fell out of an Airplane

You would think that if you fell 30,000 feet out of the sky without a parachute, you’d be toast. But it turns out that on one occasion, somebody actually survived such an accident. What If explains what happened in that very lucky case, and the far more likely outcome.

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