THE BEST Physics

Longest Simple Electric Train

Longest Simple Electric Train

A while back, YouTuber Mr. Michal showed off a simple railway he built from coils of wire, batteries, and magnets. Now, he’s back with a much longer and more complex train set that still operates on the same electromagnetic principles. This time, the track measures in at over 20 meters long, or about 66 feet.

The Science of Parkour

The Science of Parkour

Between the risks of injury and the often precarious locations, parkour and freerunning can be pretty exciting to watch. SciShow goes beyond the athleticism to the physics of the sport, digging into the things that need to happen mechanically in order to climb walls, vault over obstacles, and land without trauma.

Advertisement

Fun with Baking Soda Rockets

Fun with Baking Soda Rockets

Combining vinegar and baking soda inside a soda bottle creates an explosive amount of pressure – enough to launch the bottle sky high. Nick Uhas wanted to see not only how far he could make a soda bottle fly horizontally using this method, but also what would happen if he super-sized the experiment using a 5-gallon water jug.

Trying to to Catch a 1000 MPH Baseball

Trying to to Catch a 1000 MPH Baseball

After building a supersonic baseball cannon, Devin from SmarterEveryDay and his friends turned their attention to the business end of the cannon. The goal of their latest experiments? To see how many leather baseball gloves it takes to stop a baseball moving at 1.3 times the speed of sound.

Magnetic Accelerators

Magnetic Accelerators

The opposing forces of magnets can produce a tremendous amount of energy, and can even be used to levitate and move trains along a track. In this clip from Magnetic Games, he demonstrates these physics at work, though on a smaller scale using a bunch off-the-shelf neodymium magnets he got from Supermagnete.

Furry Tetris

Furry Tetris

C4D4U seems to have an obsession with Tetris. A while back, the CG artist showed us what the game might look like with puzzle pieces made from Jell-O, and now we get to see what happens when those same pieces get moldy and covered with hair. They remind us of Sully from Monsters, Inc.

How Strong Is Paper?

How Strong Is Paper?

The guys at the Hydraulic Press Channel have been causing paper to explode under pressure for quite some time now. In this clip they attempt to measure just how much force a stack of paper can endure before failing spectacularly.

Bursting Droplets

Bursting Droplets

Physics can be so much fun. The Lutetium Project shows how a dropper filled with a mixture of water, alcohol, and dye dripped into an oil bath can create beautiful and unexpected patterns thanks to their differences in surface tension. For more droplet fun, check this out.

Explosive Bat in Slow Motion

Explosive Bat in Slow Motion

Destin from Smarter Every Day and Shane from Stuff Made Here have had a little friendly competition going on to see who could hit a baseball furthest through engineering. Now, the two have teamed up to examine exactly how Shane’s explosively-charged home run bat works its magic, in glorious slow-motion.

The Levitating Liquid Pendulum

The Levitating Liquid Pendulum

Scientist Steve Mould shows us how, with the right conditions, you can make a viscous liquid like oil levitate by vigorously shaking it. The rapid vibrations end up stabilizing the equilibrium of the fluid as it rises and falls within a vessel.

Is Gravity an Illusion?

Is Gravity an Illusion?

Howdy, folks! It’s science time! Veritasium explains how gravity isn’t a force according to the General Theory of Relativity. He then demonstrates how the way we are moving through space-time while standing on Earth isn’t really any different from what an astronaut experiences as their rocket accelerates through space.

Blowing Underwater Fire Rings

Blowing Underwater Fire Rings

The Backyard Scientist has a penchant for dangerous, yet impressive experiments. In this clip, he takes to his swimming pool with a contraption that’s designed to blow perfect bubble rings, but instead of just filling them with oxygen, he introduces some propane, so when hit with an electric charge, they explode.

Exploding Devil’s Toothpaste

Exploding Devil’s Toothpaste

There are numerous articles out there on how to make a messy concoction called elephant toothpaste. Engineer Mark Rober has even filled a swimming pool with the stuff. Now, he’s made something far more reactive and explosive, dubbed “devil’s toothpaste.” He then supersized the experiment for a very special fan.

Advertisement

Hearing Half-way Around the World

Hearing Half-way Around the World

Sound doesn’t travel all that far in the air or on the surface of the Earth. So how is it possible the sound of explosives detonated off the coast of Australia traveled half-way around the globe to be heard in Bermuda? MinuteEarth dives into the physics that allow sound to travel so much further at the bottom of the ocean.

World’s Fastest Baseball Pitch

World’s Fastest Baseball Pitch

An excellent MLB pitcher can throw a 100 mph fastball. But what would it take to pitch a ball faster than the speed of sound? Destin from Smarter Every Day set out to answer that question, and enlisted his engineering pals to build a high-pressure cannon that can launch a ball so fast that it explodes on contact.

Thermochromic Car Pigment

Thermochromic Car Pigment

The guys at DipYourCar are known for selling peel-off Plasti Dip coatings which give cars an eye-catching new look. Here, they show off a unique black pigment that turns clear when exposed to heat, so it exposes the car’s underlying lime green paint when in the sun or splashed with warm water.

Making a Vacuum-powered Dragster

Making a Vacuum-powered Dragster

Using large syringes, Tom Stanton shows us how the vacuum captured inside can be used to drive gears, a belt, and an axle. The result is a mini dragster that travels an impressive distance compared to the short distance that the syringe’s piston moves.

Endlessly Spinning Pasta

Endlessly Spinning Pasta

The guys at ViralVideoLab claim that you can make a penne noodle spin around endlessly on a hot plate. Supposedly, if you get the temperature exactly to 240°F +/-1°, then give the noodle a push, it will keep spinning. We need Captain Disillusion to check this one out, because we have serious doubts about the physics.

CD / Color

CD / Color

Captain Disillusion is back with another one of his great educational videos about imaging technology and terminology. This time, he explains how our brains and eyes perceive color, and how computers can be used to manipulate hue, saturation, and brightness to our every whim.

Can Musicians Play Together Online?

Can Musicians Play Together Online?

With so many people staying at home and live concerts canceled all over the world, is it possible for musicians in remote locations to play in sync with each while in different locations? NPR’s Jazz Night in America explores this question and the physical and technological challenges that come with it.

Advertisement

Firehand vs. Water Balloons

Firehand vs. Water Balloons

There’s a classic physics experiment that shows how filling a balloon with water protects it from a lit match. Expanding on this idea, Beyond Slow Motion’s Darren Dyk wanted to see if the same would hold true if he held a ball of fire in his hand using butane and soap bubbles. Needless to say, don’t try this at home.

Bowling Ball Pendulum Wave

Bowling Ball Pendulum Wave

We’ve seen some pretty cool pendulum wave demonstrations before, but never one at this scale. Back in 2012, Appalachian State University teacher Jeff Goodman built this oversize physics demo rig using 16 bowling balls, and a series of chimes which play sounds as the balls brush across.

Microgravity Drop Tower

Microgravity Drop Tower

The lack of gravity in space can have strange effects on equipment and experiments. If you want to test in near zero-G conditions on Earth, you head to the Bremen Drop Tower, a 140-meter-tall chamber in which objects experience microgravity for up to 10 seconds at a time. Seeker explains how it works.

Turbulent Flow Is Awesome

Turbulent Flow Is Awesome

After watching one of Smarter Every Days‘ videos about the unique beauty of laminar flow, Derek Muller of Veritasium wanted to explore a much trickier kind of physics. When air, fluids, and gases experience turbulence, their chaos may be hard to explain and model, but it’s pretty amazing stuff when you dive in deep.

Fizzy Lifting Math

Fizzy Lifting Math

Among the many memorable scenes in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory was the one where Charlie and Grandpa Joe steal Fizzy Lifting Drinks. While it’s impossible that sipping a little soda could lift a human, Kyle Hill of Because Science figured out how much gas it would have actually taken to send Charlie sky high.

Does Time Exist?

Does Time Exist?

TED-Ed’s Andrew Zimmerman Jones provides a brief overview of the different ways in which physicists theorize how time and space relate, and ponders the question that time may not be a fundamental property of the universe, and only exists in our collective minds.

ADVERTISEMENT

Use Arrow Keys ← → for Faster Navigation

Home | About | Suggest | Contact | Team | Links | Privacy | Disclosure
Advertise | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Sites We Like

Awesome Stuff: The Awesomer | Gadgets, Games & Geeks: Technabob | Cool Cars: 95Octane
Site Design & Content © 2008-2020 Awesomer Media / The Awesomer™
Visit our Friends at: Not Always Right