X

EU Visitor Notice: This Website Uses Cookies

This website uses cookies to improve user experience, to provide analytical data to better serve our visitors, and to serve advertising to fund our operations. By using our website you consent to all cookies in accordance with our Privacy & Cookie Policy.

Your preference will be saved for 90 days, or until you clear your browser cookies.


I AGREE
I DISAGREE
Learn More

Physics

Gallium vs. Aluminum

Gallium vs. Aluminum

Over the years, YouTuber NurdRage has demonstrated how pouring liquid gallium onto aluminum can cause catastrophic failure of the normally durable, lightweight metal. Watch as the stuff causes a heat sink, sheet metal, and even a baseball bat lose its strength.

Fun with Static Electricity

Fun with Static Electricity

Phenonmena and illusion demonstrator Brusspup shows off nine fun and fascinating science experiments you can easily do yourself. Each one uses static electricity to work its magic, so you can expect to get a few shocks along the way as you practice.

Advertisement

Bullet vs Prince Rupert’s Drop

Bullet vs Prince Rupert’s Drop

SmarterEveryDay looks at the behavior of the unusually strong Prince Rupert’s drop when subjected to the firepower of a bullet. The 150,000 fps slow-mo footage reveals some truly fascinating properties as shockwaves travel through these tadpole-shaped glass droplets.

Escalator Squeeze

Escalator Squeeze

Animade and Russ Etheridge present a fun animated physics study of what would happen if you just crammed a pair of escalators with way more people than they can handle. A follow-up to their earlier clip, Train Squeeze.

Vsauce: Spinning

Vsauce: Spinning

Our favorite wordy educator provides numerous examples to hammer in the physics of spinning to help us understand its strange consequences. Leave it to Michael to not go off on a tangent when talking about tangents.

String Shooter Physics

String Shooter Physics

A mystifying physics demonstration from science teacher Bruce Yeany, in which he shows off a simple device known as a “string shooter.” It uses a motor drive to fling a loop of string into the air and keep it there thanks to their light weight and the inertia that keeps it moving forward.

Shifted Lever Machine

Shifted Lever Machine

While there’s no such thing as an actual perpetual motion machine (pesky physics!), this is still a cool demonstration how an off-balance mechanism can run for a relatively long period of time with minimal energy input.

Magnets in Slow-Mo

Magnets in Slow-Mo

TaoFledermaus was playing around with some small magnets and decided to see what their movements would look like when captured at 4,000 fps with a prototype Chronos 1.4 camera. The resulting video reveals some of their strange and wonderful behaviors.

DIY Fire Tornado

DIY Fire Tornado

TheBackyardScientist shares a simple way to create a small fire tornado with no moving parts. The trick is to split the glass receptacle in half and place each half around the flame slightly off center. The wind that comes in through the gaps will create the tornado effect.

The Walking Water Mystery

The Walking Water Mystery

Destin of SmarterEveryDay has long wondered why water droplets sometimes bounce or slide off of a body of water instead of immediately coalescing with it. He consulted astronaut and chemical engineer Don Pettit and got two answers: air and vibration.

Feeling the Forces of a Fighter Jet

Feeling the Forces of a Fighter Jet

The 560th Flying Training Squadron invited SmarterEveryDay for a test flight in the trusty Northrop T-38 Talon, a supersonic trainer jet used by the US Air Force and NASA. It gives us a thrilling glimpse of just how hard it is to handle such powerful birds.

Paper Bridge Holds 1,071 Pounds

Paper Bridge Holds 1,071 Pounds

This footage may be 8 years old, but it doesn’t make it any less impressive. Watch as then high school student Anna Gu demonstrates a bridge she made from layered and glued sheets of paper that was so strong that the hook that held the weights failed before it did. Design here.

Physics of Computer Chips

Physics of Computer Chips

Computerphile sat down with nano-scientist Phil Moriarty who explains just how tiny the wires and transistors of semiconductors are these days, and how we’re approaching a point in physics where we’re going to have to build computers very differently.

Advertisement

Pendulum Balance Robot

Pendulum Balance Robot

If you thought that machine that could balance itself on a single point was cool, check out Andreas Eder and Tobias Glück’s robot, which can swing three pivoting sections upright and keep them balanced. It can’t hold on indefinitely, but we’d like to see you do better.

Self-Balancing Stick

Self-Balancing Stick

Mike Rouleau shows off a neat bit of tech – a device which stands on a needle-like tip, but keeps itself balanced by constantly adjusting the direction and speed of motors. As one commenter put it: “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”

The Shrink Ray Death Ray

The Shrink Ray Death Ray

PBS’ It’s Okay to Be Smart considers the intellectual concept of a shrink ray, and how if it were even possible to turn us all into Mike Teavee, we’d end up dead in the process, since many of the systems our bodies rely on would fail to do their jobs in miniature.

Understanding Hydrostatics

Understanding Hydrostatics

Practical Engineering offers up an informative look at how water pressure and depth are strongly interconnected, why self-feeding pet bowls don’t spill everywhere, how barometers work, and how to boil water at room temperature.

Tesla Coil Electron Jet

Tesla Coil Electron Jet

A cool science demonstration which shows how the electrons swirling around the outside of a Tesla coil can turn it into an impromptu motor – in this case, causing a wire balanced on top of it to spin and shoot sparks as it goes. Originally seen in a video from ElectroBOOM.

Stringless Yo-Yo Science

Stringless Yo-Yo Science

Yo-Yo master Ben Conde joined science channel Veritasium and Beyond Slow Motion to demonstrate his ability toss a yo-yo into the air, let it spin without its string attached, then recover it. You’ll be entertained, and learn a thing or two about physics along the way.

Self-Pouring Liquid

Self-Pouring Liquid

Science presenter Steve Mould shows off an unusual property of a substance called polyethylene oxide. This polymer’s long-chain molecular structure lets it keep flowing all on its own. We also have a pretty good idea where they get this stuff from.

Advertisement

Fun with Electromagnets

Fun with Electromagnets

Physics Girl and Arc Attack might sound like a superhero and her evil archnemesis, but they’re just everyday geeks who love science. Here, they show us how to rip an aluminum soda can to shreds using a powerful electromagnet, along with a couple of other fun experiments.

How Earth Moves

How Earth Moves

Vsauce’s Michael Stevens returns with a typically long-winded, yet incredibly informative video about the nature of time, the innacuracies of time zones and calendars, and the way the planet’s tilt and rotation affect time. Say, is it Local Apparent Solar Noon yet?

The Physics of the Theremin

The Physics of the Theremin

The theremin is one of the strangest musical instruments of all time. SciShow takes us inside the process that lets you play this retrofantastic electronic instrument without ever touching it. It’s all about using your body as part of a giant capacitor.

How Far Can We Go?

How Far Can We Go?

Our smarty pants friends at Kurzgesagt examines the idea of human exploration, and some of the currently known limitations of space travel, physics, and our own bodies which prevent us from traveling to an unfathomable portion of the great unknown.

The Woosh Bottle

The Woosh Bottle

CrazyRussianHacker demonstrates a cool science experiment which uses a glass water bottle coated with a small amount of isopropyl alcohol to create a totally cool flame which travels down the walls of the bottle. Kids, don’t try this at home.

Landing a Falling Helicopter

Landing a Falling Helicopter

Smarter Every Day’s Destin Sandlin takes on a tweet by Neil deGrasse Tyson in which he stated that a stalled helicopter would land like a brick. Destin and pilots Brad and Gerry Friesen not only put their lives on the line to test this, but prove that nobody is right 100% of the time.

How to Survive a Grenade Blast

How to Survive a Grenade Blast

While he was hanging out at the pool with The Backyard Scientist, engineer and YouTube celeb Mark Rober conducted a scientific experiment which demonstrates whether it’s better to be underwater or on land to escape a grenade blast. The results might surprise you.

How Strong is Oobleck?

How Strong is Oobleck?

The Backyard Scientist continues his literally and figuratively sloppy experiments by “testing” oobleck (cornstarch mixed with water). Like ketchup, quicksand and silly putty, oobleck is a Non-Newtonian fluid. It flows like a liquid but behaves differently when force is applied to it.

Why Airplane Wings Are Angled

Why Airplane Wings Are Angled

It used to be that most airplane wings were straight, but it turns out the design caused instability as flight speeds increased. Real Engineering takes a look at the science behind the swept wing design which is commonplace on today’s planes. Learn more here.

Printable Magnets

Printable Magnets

Destin of Smarter Every Day shows off a fascinating technology which allows magnetic fields to be printed into custom configurations. With this tech, engineers at Polymagnets can now “program” magnets that do exactly what they want them to do.

When Molten Salt Hits Water

When Molten Salt Hits Water

The Backyard Scientist shows off what happens when salt is melted (at ~1400ºF) and then poured into in an aquarium filled with room temperature water. The end result is a shockingly big boom that sends glass and water flying everywhere. (Thanks Paul!)

ADVERTISEMENT

Use Arrow Keys ← → for Faster Navigation | Keyboard Shortcuts: OnOff

Home | About | Suggest | Contact | Team | Links | Privacy | Disclosure | Advertise | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Sites We Like

Awesome Stuff: The Awesomer | Gadgets, Games & Geeks: Technabob | Cool Cars: 95Octane
Site Design & Content © 2008-2019 Awesomer Media / The Awesomer™
Visit our Friends at: Not Always Right