THE BEST Science

World’s Largest Dry Ice Bubble

World’s Largest Dry Ice Bubble

While we’re not sure that Liam Thompson really set any kind of world record, we’re still mighty impressed with the gigantic soap bubble he and his sister managed to make using dish soap, dry ice, an inflatable kiddie pool, and a piece of string.

Everything Is Chemical

Everything Is Chemical

Every living thing on Earth is made up of mix of chemical elements, including carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. This animated short from NM State University’s Learning Games Lab provides a laypersons’ explanation of how chemical bonds create life and provide the nutrients needed to keep it going.

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Ice Bodies

Ice Bodies

Artist and museum exhibit designer Shawn Lani has built a machine that circulates dry ice into a shallow tub of water, resulting in captivating cloud-like motion as the frozen carbon dioxide melts. His Icy Bodies exhibit can be found in a number of science museums around the world.

The Earth in One Day

The Earth in One Day

Imagine, if you will, that the entire 4.5 billion year history of the Earth was collapsed down to a 24-hour single day. Bright Side’s educational video does just that, taking significant events in the development of our world and giving us a relative sense of how closely together they played out.

Do the Past and Future Exist?

Do the Past and Future Exist?

Ready to have your mind blown? In much the same way as a Christopher Nolan movie, PBS Space Time host Matt O’Dowd is here to mess with our understandings about time, as he explores theories that look at the relationships between the past, the present, and the future.

Zooming Into Circuits

Zooming Into Circuits

LaughsMicroscopically uses a scanning electron microscope to take us deeper and deeper inside of a series of integrated circuits dating from 1989 to 2001. These now “vintage” circuits are far less dense than today’s designs, but are still an amazing marvel of engineering viewed in this way.

The Levitating Liquid Pendulum

The Levitating Liquid Pendulum

Scientist Steve Mould shows us how, with the right conditions, you can make a viscous liquid like oil levitate by vigorously shaking it. The rapid vibrations end up stabilizing the equilibrium of the fluid as it rises and falls within a vessel.

Solar System Object Comparison

Solar System Object Comparison

We’re used to seeing our solar system illustrated in concentric rings. This helps us to understand their positions, but this animation by Dr. James O’Donoghue provides a different perspective, showing the relative sizes, rotational speeds, and axial tilts of everything from the dwarf planet Ceres to our mighty Sun.

How Old Is Sunlight?

How Old Is Sunlight?

The speed of light is pretty darned fast, but given just how far the Earth is away from the Sun, its light doesn’t get here instantly. It’s Okay to Be Smart teaches us how it’s not just a simple math equation, but complex astrophysics explain how sunlight is much older than you’d think.

Is Gravity an Illusion?

Is Gravity an Illusion?

Howdy, folks! It’s science time! Veritasium explains how gravity isn’t a force according to the General Theory of Relativity. He then demonstrates how the way we are moving through space-time while standing on Earth isn’t really any different from what an astronaut experiences as their rocket accelerates through space.

When Time Became History

When Time Became History

To celebrate the release of their Human Era Calendar for the year 12,021, Kurzgesagt looks to the distant future to imagine what it might be like for future archeologists as they attempt to reconstruct our present, along with the challenges we face figuring out our past.

The Infinite Pattern

The Infinite Pattern

Are you craving your daily dose of math and science? Veritasium is here to fill our brains with all kinds of interesting facts about geometry and patterns, eventually leading to a demonstration of interlocking tiles that can extend infinitely across a plane without ever repeating their layout.

Universe in a Nutshell

Universe in a Nutshell

Science education channel Kurzgesagt teamed up with storytellers Wait But Why to create their first official mobile app, an interactive plaything that lets you view the relative size of things in the universe. Swipe left to zoom in. Swipe right to zoom out. Then tap on objects for fun facts about them. Available on iOS and Android.

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The Largest Star in the Universe

The Largest Star in the Universe

If you think our galaxy’s sun is big, wait ’til you get a load of Kurzgesagt’s latest science video, which explores the universe in search of the biggest, brightest, densest, and most energetic stars. Along the way, you’ll learn how a star’s age can influence its size dramatically.

Hearing Half-way Around the World

Hearing Half-way Around the World

Sound doesn’t travel all that far in the air or on the surface of the Earth. So how is it possible the sound of explosives detonated off the coast of Australia traveled half-way around the globe to be heard in Bermuda? MinuteEarth dives into the physics that allow sound to travel so much further at the bottom of the ocean.

Metal Fest Blankets and More

Metal Fest Blankets and More

Rock out with all your favorite metal bands every time you take a nap. These silly home accessories from Threadless and designer Grant Shepley looks like concert posters, but the headliners and second-stage acts are all made entirely from actual metal. Available in blankets, duvets, throw pillows, shower curtains, and bath mats.

Launching a Rocket Underwater

Launching a Rocket Underwater

Warped Perception enjoys seeing how things look in slow-motion. He recently got the idea to launch a model rocket from inside of an aquarium, letting us see how it behaves both in and out of the water. We love the way its exhaust plume changes as it breaks the surface of the water.

The Rise of Molds

The Rise of Molds

Mold takes many forms, from harmful to helpful, from toxic to delicious. But one thing we never thought mold could be is beautiful. Through the macro lens of Beauty of Science, enjoy this incredible close-up look at four kinds of molds used in food fermentation. As they grow, they look like plants on an alien landscape.

Making a Vacuum-powered Dragster

Making a Vacuum-powered Dragster

Using large syringes, Tom Stanton shows us how the vacuum captured inside can be used to drive gears, a belt, and an axle. The result is a mini dragster that travels an impressive distance compared to the short distance that the syringe’s piston moves.

Bursting Droplets

Bursting Droplets

Physics can be so much fun. The Lutetium Project shows how a dropper filled with a mixture of water, alcohol, and dye dripped into an oil bath can create beautiful and unexpected patterns thanks to their differences in surface tension. For more droplet fun, check this out.

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The Pocket Scientist Wallet Card

The Pocket Scientist Wallet Card

This laser-engraved stainless steel card is packed with reference information for scientists and engineers. Its front side has the periodic table of the elements, along with rulers and a protractor, while its back offers up quick access to important constants, formulae, and conversions. There’s also a version for chemistry.

Mining Asteroids

Mining Asteroids

Many of the rarest and most precious materials used here on Earth comes from some form of mining. But might there be a better way to harvest these without depleting and polluting our home planet? Kurzgesagt explores the potential for mining a nearly endless supply of resources from lifeless asteroids.

How the Space Shuttle Worked

How the Space Shuttle Worked

Despite its two tragic missions, with 135 launches to its credit, the Space Shuttle was arguably the most successful space program of all time. 3D animator Jared Owen explains how shuttle missions worked, along with an in-depth look at the orbiter, where astronauts spent their time throughout their journeys.

Sharks vs. Blood

Sharks vs. Blood

After an earlier experiment with trying to get sharks to swarm into human blood, Engineer Mark Rober teamed up with Discovery’s Shark Week to build a single-person shark cage, and headed into the waters of the Bahamas to see if he could get a feeding frenzy going around him using fish blood instead.

What Was Starlite?.. and How to Make It

What Was Starlite?.. and How to Make It

Back in the 1980s, hairdresser and inventor Maurice Ward came up with a substance that was apparently incredibly resistant to heat and fire. NightHawkinLight explores the history of the material known as Starlite, what happened to it, and then makes his own version of the compound.

What Do Aliens Look Like?

What Do Aliens Look Like?

We prefer the title “What MIGHT Aliens Look Like?” for Kurgezagt’s video, in which they explore the possibilities of alien life forms, and attempt to explain how they might appear, using something called The Kardashev Scale, which estimates a civilization’s potential for technology based on the availability of energy.

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