Sampling

Beer Can Sounds

Beer Can Sounds

One of the most satisfying sounds on earth is that noise a cold can of beer makes when you pop it open. Musician Koji Kobura agrees, and decided to sample a bunch of sounds he could make with a beer can, ultimately turning them into a short EDM track.

The Most Sampled Loop

The Most Sampled Loop

Amen, Brother is an obscure B-side from a 1969 record by The Winstons, but it’s also the source for a six-second, 4-bar drum and bass sample which has found its way into literally thousands of hip hop, techno, dance, and pop songs. It’s even in the Futurama theme.

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Gourski & Appel: Docks

Gourski & Appel: Docks

Rather than using traditional instruments, performers Daniel Gourski and DJ Jonas Appel headed to an abandoned industrial compound, and sampled sounds of the equipment to create every sound you hear. The good old metal drum seems to be the most versatile.

The Most Sampled Song

The Most Sampled Song

Between WhoSampled and Everything Is a Remix, we know that there’s not a ton of 100% originality in music production. But we had no idea that Hall and Oates Rich Girl appeared in so many hit songs. Then again, this is a video from The Onion, so the joke’s on us.

A History of Sampling

A History of Sampling

DJ and Producer Chris Read of the awesome website WhoSampled dropped by London’s Point Blank Music School to provide an in-depth workshop on the origins of sampling in hip-hop music, modern sound layering, and how music has been derivative for hundreds of years.

Gorillaz Samples (2001-2017)

Gorillaz Samples (2001-2017)

Besides Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett, one thing that’s been consistent in Gorillaz’ ever-changing 16+ year run is the use of samples. Kirima Nagi put together this video which catalogs some of the many sound bites which have made their way into the group’s tracks.

How Sampling Changed Music

How Sampling Changed Music

The fine folks at Holy Kaw! dusted off this 2014 TED Talk with DJ, musician, and producer Mark Ronson, as he uses samples of previous TED Talks to explain how the ability to record, tune, tweak and modify existing sounds transformed the way music is made.

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