THE BEST Kurzgesagt

How Large Can a Bacteria Get?

How Large Can a Bacteria Get?

Each of our bodies is teeming with trillions of bacteria at any given moment. Thankfully, these microscopic organisms generally work in harmony with our cells. But how did evolution prevent bacteria from becoming as big as a whale? Kurzgesagt explores this question in the latest episode of their Life & Size series.

When Time Became History

When Time Became History

To celebrate the release of their Human Era Calendar for the year 12,021, Kurzgesagt looks to the distant future to imagine what it might be like for future archeologists as they attempt to reconstruct our present, along with the challenges we face figuring out our past.

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Universe in a Nutshell

Universe in a Nutshell

Science education channel Kurzgesagt teamed up with storytellers Wait But Why to create their first official mobile app, an interactive plaything that lets you view the relative size of things in the universe. Swipe left to zoom in. Swipe right to zoom out. Then tap on objects for fun facts about them. Available on iOS and Android.

The Largest Star in the Universe

The Largest Star in the Universe

If you think our galaxy’s sun is big, wait ’til you get a load of Kurzgesagt’s latest science video, which explores the universe in search of the biggest, brightest, densest, and most energetic stars. Along the way, you’ll learn how a star’s age can influence its size dramatically.

The Mighty Weaver Ant

The Mighty Weaver Ant

Kurzgesagt introduces us to the oecophylla weaver ant. These long-legged insects dwell in tropical jungles, building incredible colonies that spread upwards and sideways between trees. They’re not only incredibly industrious, they’re fierce warriors and defenders of their kingdoms.

Mining Asteroids

Mining Asteroids

Many of the rarest and most precious materials used here on Earth comes from some form of mining. But might there be a better way to harvest these without depleting and polluting our home planet? Kurzgesagt explores the potential for mining a nearly endless supply of resources from lifeless asteroids.

What Do Aliens Look Like?

What Do Aliens Look Like?

We prefer the title “What MIGHT Aliens Look Like?” for Kurgezagt’s video, in which they explore the possibilities of alien life forms, and attempt to explain how they might appear, using something called The Kardashev Scale, which estimates a civilization’s potential for technology based on the availability of energy.

Why Are You Alive?

Why Are You Alive?

Even when you’re sound asleep, there are billions of processes going on inside of your body. Kurzgesagt explores the forces, energy sources, and organic compounds at work that keep us alive and ticking, despite the universe’s tendency towards entropy.

Solar Storms vs. Civilization

Solar Storms vs. Civilization

Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are frequent occurrences on the Sun. Some have been known to disrupt radio waves, but could they actually cause damage? Kurzgesagt stares directly into the Sun to educate us on solar storms, why they occur, and if a strong enough super storm could actually wipe out civilization.

The Past We Can Never Return to

The Past We Can Never Return to

Science video makers Kurzgesagt teamed up with author and online personality John Green to create an animated clip to accompany an excerpt from his podcast The Anthropocene Reviewed. The focus of the episode is on the possible meaning of cave paintings, and what they might tell us about the human condition.

Milk: It Does a Body Good?

Milk: It Does a Body Good?

From birth, mammals rely on milk for nutrition. We’ve been taught for decades that drinking cow’s milk is good for us, and part of a nutritious day. But as Kurzgesagt explains, recent studies call into question whether milk is really good for us, or if it’s slowly killing us. Plus, its production has dire environmental consequences.

How to Escape a Supernova

How to Escape a Supernova

Things are always changing in the universe, so it’s possible that someday in the distant future that the Earth could be in danger from a catastrophic force. But is there a way that we could avoid such a fate given enough notice and ingenuity? Kurzgesagt digs into a theoretical method to do just that, by moving our entire solar system.

An Antidote to Dissatisfaction

An Antidote to Dissatisfaction

If you follow them on any regular basis, you know that Kurzgesagt is mostly focused on videos about science, the future, and the nature of our universe. But this time, they offer up a clip that is more about improving our lives in the here and now, looking at how gratitude works, and why it’s so important for us to embrace it.

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What’s a Skyhook?

What’s a Skyhook?

Sending cargo and ships into space is extremely expensive and resource-intensive. But there’s an idea that’s been bandied about that would use endlessly-moving tethers to catapult ships into space from Earth’s orbit. Kurzgesagt explains how this relatively simple concept could dramatically improve space travel.

What’s a Neutron Star?

What’s a Neutron Star?

If you find space science fascinating, check out this clip from Kurzgesagt, in which they explain how neutron stars work. These phenomena may only be a few kilometers in diameter, but have an insanely dense atomic nucleus and powerful gravity, thanks to their origins as massive stars which have collapsed and gone supernova.

If We Nuked a City

If We Nuked a City

It’s a terrifying thought, but in the interest of keeping us educated about the dangers of nuclear weapons, Kurzgesagt is here to teach us just how awful it would be if humans ever were ever to detonate a nuclear weapon in a city. Even worse, we actually did this to people back in WWII.

The Deadliest Being on Earth

The Deadliest Being on Earth

“There are more phages on Earth than every other organism combined.” Kurzgesagt takes a few minutes to educate us on the finer points of the bacteriophage, a type of virus which is constantly killing off billions of microscopic organisms all around and inside of us.

The Billion Ant Megacolony

The Billion Ant Megacolony

Kurzgesagt already taught us how ants thrive on war. But it turns out that one particular ant species has used their fighting and strategic skills (with a little help from humans) to build a truly global empire. We wouldn’t doubt if their numbers were actually in the trillions.

The Most Solitary Place on Earth

The Most Solitary Place on Earth

For as much as we think of our planet as good old terra firma, there is so much more to be seen and explored at the beneath the surface of our oceans. Kurzgesagt takes us on a deep sea journey to learn about some of the many species that dwell in the darkest waters.

The Egg

The Egg

The typically informative Kurzgesagt takes a break from fact to present a work of animated fiction. Based on an original short story by Andy Weir, The Egg is a hopeful tale of what might happen after we leave our bodies behind, and how we are all interconnected in a way.

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Do Robots Deserve Rights?

Do Robots Deserve Rights?

Kurzgesagt asks some of the most difficult questions that will become exponentially more relevant in the years to come. Do robots deserve rights? Would they even need or want the same rights that humans have?

The World War of the Ants

The World War of the Ants

Think that humans fight and kill a lot? Kurzgesagt aims its magnifying glass at the tiny world of ant colonies, where billions of the bugs violently battle against other kinds of ants and insects every single day of their lives. From decapitations to cannibalism, life as an ant can be brutal.

Tiny Bombs in Your Blood

Tiny Bombs in Your Blood

Kurzgesagt once again dives deep within our bodies, this time to explore the complement system, a part of our immune system which can activate to help defend us from disease, but that also needs to be kept in check to keep from destroying us from the inside.

Could Your Phone Hurt You?

Could Your Phone Hurt You?

There’s been a long-held concern that the electromagnetic radiation that emanate from cell phones, power lines, and other devices could cause harm to our bodies. But is there any truth to this concern? Kurzgesagt attempts to separate the fact from fiction in this controvertial topic.

Is Meat Bad for You?

Is Meat Bad for You?

You might think that mammals always ate meat, but it turns out it was an evolutionary necessity due to changes in Earth’s climate. Kurzgesagt explores whether or not this change in our diets was actually good for us, or if eating meat truly has a negative impact on our health.

Kurzgesagt: Strange Stars Explained

Kurzgesagt: Strange Stars Explained

Kurzgesagt takes on one of the most bizarre and terrifying objects in the universe: neutron stars. Formed when certain giant stars collapse, neutron stars are made of strange matter, which are theoretically “perfectly stable.” And that’s where Physics and English disagree.

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