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Awesome Damascus

Making a Damascus Dagger from Steel Balls

Making a Damascus Dagger from Steel Balls

Damascus steel is made by pressing layers of forged metal together. HANS shows how he made a gorgeous dagger using thousands of steel bearing balls. The resulting metal pattern is something he calls Dragon Skin. After making the blade, he fabricated a brass crossguard and a wooden handle. It’s based on a design by Neels Van Den Berg of Black Dragon Forge.

Carved EDC Wood+Resin Pocket Knives

Carved EDC Wood+Resin Pocket Knives
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Carved handcrafts one-of-a-kind accessories using wood and resin. In addition to their wonderful live-edge phone cases, they make artful pocket knives. They feature a lightweight titanium frame with a 3-inch damascus steel blade and handle scales made from wood burl and pools of colorful resin. These knives make great gifts for that special person on your list.
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Making a Denim Damascus Table

Making a Denim Damascus Table

Cam from Blacktail Studio built a coffee table out of denim. Now he’s back with an even more impressive fabric table with patterns typically found in damascus steel. He started by cutting abstract wooden forms that he added to his mold. Then he layered denim, poured epoxy, vacuum-infused it, and ran it through an industrial planer to reveal the patterns.

Turning Rulers Into a Damascus Meat Cleaver

Turning Rulers Into a Damascus Meat Cleaver

Random Hands shows how they turned a stack of stainless steel rulers into a unique Damascus pattern, which he sandwiched around high-carbon steel to make a beautiful Japanese-style meat cleaver. He fitted it with a hexagonal wood handle and a hand-stitched leather sheath. We’d love this knife in our kitchen, but sadly, this one isn’t for sale.

Making Damascus from Calligraphy Pen Nibs

Making Damascus from Calligraphy Pen Nibs

On his quest to make damascus out of every kind of metal object he can find, Shurap is back with another satisfying blacksmithing project. After arranging hundreds of individual calligraphy pen nibs into steel tubing, he forged, hammered, and twisted the molten metal to form a beautifully-patterned dagger.

Making a Damascus Knife from Measuring Tapes

Making a Damascus Knife from Measuring Tapes

We always enjoy seeing how various metal items can be forged into Damascus steel. Random Hands shows off the process of turning a stack of measuring tape blades into a unique kitchen knife with one of the prettiest blade patterns ever.

Making a Damascus Steel Blade from Staples

Making a Damascus Steel Blade from Staples

Ukraine-based blacksmith Shurap has made Damascus steel from a variety of unusual items. For his latest blade-making experiment, he took stacks of staples, nested them into star-shaped clusters, added steel flux powder, then forged and hammered them to create a pattern we’ve not seen on a knife before.

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Forging a Forbidden Japanese Tri-Dagger

Forging a Forbidden Japanese Tri-Dagger

Black Beard Projects created this dagger as his entry into the Fantasy Challenge. He starts the build by layering steel into a Damascus pattern, then forming it into a triangle and twisting and honing the metal to create its unique blade. After that, he made an engraved brass guard, a wrapped wooden handle, and a brass pommel.

Making a Ring from Twisted Sawblades

Making a Ring from Twisted Sawblades

Black Beard Projects shows off an interesting way to create a steel ring. The blacksmith started with a rusty bandsaw blade and chopped it up into flat pieces. He then welded, forged, and hammered them multiple times to create a Damascus pattern before twisting the metal into a cylinder and refining it into its final form.

Forging a Damascus Knife from Pennies and Dimes

Forging a Damascus Knife from Pennies and Dimes

One reason metals are so wonderful is because they can be melted down over and over again to form new objects. In this video from Rob Bonifacio, he shows us how he took some Canadian copper pennies and dimes, layered them with high-carbon steel and forged them into a Damascus blade for a knife. Part two here.

Fanciest Pizza Cutter Ever

Fanciest Pizza Cutter Ever

A store-bought pizza cutter is usually made from stainless steel. The guys from Waterjet Channel decided to make one from Damascus steel and titanium instead, so they teamed up with Jesse and Jeff from Vegas Forge to create this impressive wheel for slicing with style. Though we’d hate to get cheese all over it.

Böker Tirpitz Knives

Böker Tirpitz Knives
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These unique damascus knives are made by forging and folding steel recovered from the Tirpitz, a German WWII battleship sunk off the coast of Norway by Allied bombers. There are four limited-edition knives in the series, the Barlow Prime Tirpitz-Damascus, the Tirpitz-Damascus, the Tirpitz-Damascus Wood, and the Tirpitz-Damascus Gold.

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Slim Damascus Pen Knife

Slim Damascus Pen Knife
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This thin folding knife has a straight-back blade made from 60 HRC hammered steel with a beautiful Damascus pattern. Its snakewood handle has a similarly rippled design, accented by a bright blue aluminum clip. A liner lock keeps the blade from accidentally closing. It measures 7.75″ overall with a 3.5″ blade length.

Lightoller Damascus Steel EDC Folding Knife

Lightoller Damascus Steel EDC Folding Knife
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This unique knife is named for Charles Lightoller, who helped women and children onto lifeboats on the Titanic and later rescued 127 men at Dunkirk. The compact EDC knife has a 1.9″ Damascus steel blade with a twist pattern. Its handle combines Damascus steel and rosewood. Includes a full-grain leather sheath.

Forging a Copper Damascus Bowie Knife

Forging a Copper Damascus Bowie Knife

Typically, Damascus patterned metal is made entirely from steel. But it looks even more amazing with copper folded in. Tyrell Knifeworks walks us through the process of forging a gorgeous bowie knife by welding then pressing together layers of the mixed metals. The colors in the handle look awesome with the blade.

Railroad Track Viking Hatchet

Railroad Track Viking Hatchet

Blacksmith Black Beard Projects shows off a really sweet build – a replica of a Viking-style bearded hatchet. Its sweeping axe head started off life as a section of a railroad track, and its handle was hand-carved from elm wood. Also, we’re suckers for anything with a Damascus pattern.

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