Awesome 3d Printing

3D Printed Medieval City

3D Printed Medieval City

3D printing technology has been a boon for model makers. Knarb Makes shows off a diorama he built of a medieval city with the help of the tech – though there’s still plenty of artistic talent on display. The impressive Venice-inspired scale city has more than 50 buildings, bridges, canals, and lighting.

Making a Mini Stonehenge

Making a Mini Stonehenge

Fans of This Is Spinal Tap will immediately get a giggle out of this even smaller version of Stonehenge created by model artist Luke Towan. He created the detailed replica of the ancient monument with the help of an Anycubic Photon Ultra resin 3D printer.

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DefeXtiles

DefeXtiles

Researchers from the MIT Media Lab developed a method for 3D printing that creates soft and stretchable textiles. The process takes advantage of a defect that can occur in 3D printing – underextruded thermoplastics. By precisely controlling this behavior, they were able to make thin, flexible fabrics with custom patterns.

Making a Bronze Measuring Cube

Making a Bronze Measuring Cube

Robinson Foundry crafted this useful brass kitchen gadget using a 3D printed measuring cube as a starting point. Like some of his other creations, he used the “Lost PLA” method to create a ceramic mold around the 3D print and then melted away the plastic. We wonder how accurate it is compared to the original.

Color Illusion 3D-printed Skull

Color Illusion 3D-printed Skull

Using a professional full-color 3D printer and taking advantage of the stairstepped surfaces of voxels, Make Anything was able to create a sweet model of a human skull that appears to change colors when viewed from different angles. Download the model here.

3D Printing Rockets

3D Printing Rockets

Building full-size rockets typically requires the creation of costly custom tooling. But Relativity Space is taking a different approach to the problem, using a giant 3D printer and additive manufacturing to melt and form aluminum into the shape of a rocket. Veritasium takes us inside of their facility for a look at how it works.

3D Printing a Lighted Sign

3D Printing a Lighted Sign

3D printer manufacturer Piocreat shows how they made a colorful light-up sign of their logo using their Creatwit 3D printer, which is optimized for printing lettering. They filled the fronts of the letters with liquid acrylic to enhance the lighting effect, then laser-cut a backing sheet and attached LEDs before assembling the light.

Turning Bullet Casings Into Brass Coins

Turning Bullet Casings Into Brass Coins

If you’ve been to a firing range, you’ll see countless shell casings littering the ground. Seth over at Robinson Foundry wanted to put these to use, so he melted down the brass casings and turned them into custom coins. He created the shapes by 3D printing coin models, then placed them into a sand mold for casting.

Self-Standing Dominoes

Self-Standing Dominoes

Normally, when you knock over dominoes, they stay down. But is it possible to create a domino that stands itself back up using the energy that toppled it? The Action Lab explores this very possibility with some unique 3D-printed dominoes. You can grab the 3D models on Thingiverse if you want to play with them for yourself.

Recycling Cardboard Into 3D Objects

Recycling Cardboard Into 3D Objects

There are lots of tutorials how to recycle paper to create handmade paper. XYZAidan shows how the pulp extracted from cardboard can also be molded into sturdy 3D objects. The resulting pieces are reminiscent of egg crates or Starbucks drink trays. You can download his 3D printable mold designs on Thingiverse.

3D Printed Roller Coaster

3D Printed Roller Coaster

This miniature roller coaster is made from 3D-printed parts and has a motorized launch system and working brakes. The cars, twisty tracks, and supports were digitally fabricated. Its motion is controlled by an Arduino, micro servo motors, and a DC motor. It took 3D Coasters roughly six months to complete the project.

Infinite 3D Printer

Infinite 3D Printer

One of the limitations of cheap desktop 3D printers is their small print bed size. But this nifty hack by Swaleh Owais incorporates a conveyor belt print surface that can eject parts and then move on to the next one without human intervention. By angling its print head, it can also print very long objects.

Turning a 3D Print into a Brass Sculpture

Turning a 3D Print into a Brass Sculpture

3D printed objects are typically made out of plastic. But as Robinson Foundry shows us, these computer-generated pieces can be used to produce detailed castings for more substantial materials. In this case, he output a 3D print of a menacing alien emperor and used it to create a ceramic mold for an awesome brass sculpture.

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Giant Castle 3D Print

Giant Castle 3D Print

Most 3D prints we’ve seen are pretty small. But the guys at Argentina’s Trideo make the Big-T – a $40,000 industrial 3D printer that can crank out precise objects as large as 40″ x 40″ x 42.5″. Watch as it churns out a detailed model of a 39″ tall castle that tool almost 10 days to output. After that, watch it print a horse.

Super-size 3D Printer

Super-size 3D Printer

Ivan Miranda has built a few homebrew 3D printers, including three very big printers. His latest build – the Giant 3D Printer MkIV is his largest yet, with a 1000mm x 500mm (39.3″ x 19.7″) heated printing bed. Follow along with the build process, then watch it print a massive plastic wrench. You can buy the plans to build your own here.

3Doodler PRO+ 3D Printing Pen

3Doodler PRO+ 3D Printing Pen

With a price approaching some 3D printers, the 3Doodler Pro+ isn’t for everyone, but it does feature big upgrades including a powerful dual-drive system, precision temperature controls that enable more intricate and consistent drawings. It can print with ABS, PLA, FLEXY, wood, copper, bronze, and nylon filaments.

3D-Printed Statue Self-Portrait

3D-Printed Statue Self-Portrait

With the help of Pikus Concrete, Zack Nelson of JerryRigEverything managed to have a gigantic 3D-printed statue created in his own image. The 12-foot-tall concrete sculpture weighs in at 6,000 pounds, and Jerry had it dropped next to his buddy’s swimming pool as a prank. We’re sure it will soon get sliced open by What’s Inside.

Diver and Manta Ray Resin Art

Diver and Manta Ray Resin Art

Artist Rayclay used a combination of 3D modeling software, 3D printing, and hand-finishing to create miniature models of a freediver and a manta ray. He then precisely painted the pieces and submerged them in transparent resin to create the illusion they were swimming beneath the ocean’s surface.

All-at-once 3D Printing

All-at-once 3D Printing

Typical 3D printers build up objects one layer at a time. This new technology is capable of printing an entire, highly-detailed object at once. The one big caveat of EFPL and Readily3D’s volumetric printer is that it can only print really tiny objects. Since it can print in a sterile container, it could be used for biomedical applications.

3D Printed Textscapes

3D Printed Textscapes

Artist Hongtao Zhou uses 3D printing to produce these wildly innovative works of art. Each one offers up a tactile and dimensional sculpture of a city, sculpted from letters of varying heights, and forming words which describe the locale. Some of his works are even printed on a flexible background so they bend like paper.

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DIY Carbon Fiber Skateboard

DIY Carbon Fiber Skateboard

Maker James Bruton is a big fan of 3D printing. In this video, he uses his Lulzbot HS+1.2 heavy duty print head to output carbon fiber reinforced plastic filament to create a skateboard with a unique structure. He then takes it for a spin to see just how strong it is.

3D Printed Concrete Firepit

3D Printed Concrete Firepit

HomeMadeModern shows us how to use 3D modeling software and a 3D printer to create a set of silicone molds for casting a concrete firepit. Despite the complex look, the entire design you see was created from just three different mold shapes.

3D Printing a Boat

3D Printing a Boat

The University of Maine’s Advanced Structures and Composites Center now has a 3D printer that can crank out objects up to 100 feet-long, 22 feet-wide, and 10 feet-high. In this brief time-lapse, watch 72 hours condensed down to 30 seconds as it outputs a 25 foot-long boat that weights 5,000 pounds. And yes, it floats.

Analogue Loaders

Analogue Loaders

Animator Raphael Vangelis pays tribute to all the lost time spent watching spinning circles, hourglasses, beachballs, and progress bars on our computer screens, by replicating the idea with stop-motion animation and 3D printing. The behind the scenes video equally enthralling.

The Smash-Proof Guitar

The Smash-Proof Guitar

Sandvik created what it believes is a nearly indestructible guitar. Its body was 3D printed out of titanium, while its neck, fretboard and hub were milled from stainless steel. They let prolific axe wrecker Yngwie Malsmsteen put it to the test.

Drawing a 3D Globe

Drawing a 3D Globe

Using a pair of clear plastic domes as a canvas and a 3D printing pen, artist 3D Sanago created a wireframe model of our planet, then proceeded to conjure up some plastic gears and attach the whole thing to a motorized base. The result is a neat see-through, spinning globe.

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