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Martin Scorsese

Chantix x Goodfellas

Chantix x Goodfellas

It is kind of strange to see award-winning actor Ray Liotta in those commercials for Chantix. Editor Joey Lindquist decided to weave the commercial and its many side effect warnings in with footage from Goodfellas to make it a bit more compelling.

The Endurance of Goodfellas

The Endurance of Goodfellas

Martin Scorsese’s 1990 Goodfellas is not only one of his best films, but one of the best films of all time. Film essayist Jacob T. Swinney and Fandor offer their take on what it is about the 1990 gangster movie that made it so memorable and influential.

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Thank God for the Rain

Thank God for the Rain

(PG-13: Language) Animator Piotr Kabat created this fantastic graphic interpretation of Travis Bickle’s darkly poetic monologue from Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver. The minimal style and scheme echoes the bleak backdrop of the skeezier side of 1970s New York City.

Martin Scorsese: God’s Eye View

Martin Scorsese: God’s Eye View

(PG-13) Martin Scorsese has lots of tricks up his sleeves, but one of his most effective is to peek in on his character’s often tragic lives from above their heads. Jorge Luengo Ruiz created this stellar compilation of the director’s many top-down moments.

Silence (Trailer)

Silence (Trailer)

Andrew Garfield, Adam Driver and Liam Neeson play 17th century Portuguese priests trying to spread their faith in Japan in Martin Scorsese’s epic adaptation of the critically-acclaimed eponymous novel by Shusaku Endo.

The Eyes of Taxi Driver

The Eyes of Taxi Driver

(Gore) Taxi Driver is mostly told from the perspective of protagonist Travis Bickle. Fandor’s Jacob T. Swinney points out some of the ways that director Martin Scorsese showed the world through Travis’ eyes, whether literally or figuratively.

A Method to Scorsese’s Madness

A Method to Scorsese’s Madness

(Flashing lights, Gore) Frame by Frame points out that Martin Scorsese’s movies are memorable and refreshing partly because he’s good at using two techniques that are conventionally at odds: neorealism and post-modernism.

Scorsese in the Red

Scorsese in the Red

(Gore) Filmscalpel takes a look at Martin Scorsese’s masterful use of shades of red in many of his films, which functions as both a technical nod to early color-toned films, and a punctuation on scenes of violence, anger, terror, and occasionally awe.

Martin Scorsese: The Art of Silence

Martin Scorsese: The Art of Silence

(NSFW: Language) Open up your brain tanks cinephiles. Film critic Tony Zhou is back with another lesson. This time he talks about the use of silence, a technique that director Martin Scorsese has mastered.

Hugo Steadicam Shot

Hugo Steadicam Shot

SteadiCam operator Larry McConkey dons a helmet cam to show us what it’s like to shoot one of Martin Scorsese’s famously long tracking shots in this memorable one-shot scene from Hugo.

Walt Disney’s Taxi Driver

Walt Disney’s Taxi Driver

Bryan Boyce infuses Scorsese’s classic with a little shot of Disney, through the use of clever editing and visual tweaks to the explicit original. The ending is particularly clever (and accurate.)

Michel Gondry’s Taxi Driver

Michel Gondry’s Taxi Driver

The offbeat director created this low-budget “sweded” version of Scorsese’s classic Taxi Driver, played prior to the French premiere of Scorsese’s slightly more family-friendly Hugo.

Taxi Driver (Blu-Ray)

Taxi Driver (Blu-Ray)

This isn’t just any Blu-ray release. Not only is Scorcese’s ultra-violent flick one of the greatest movies of all time, it’s been lovingly restored from 4K digital scans of an original, 35mm negative.

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Kubrick x Scorcese

Kubrick x Scorcese

Video mashup magician Leandro Copperfield spent 25 days, painstakingly combining the most memorable (and violent) scenes ever from 34 films by Stanley Kubrick and Martin Scorcese. (NSFW).

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