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Awesome Vintage

Automatic Candle Snuffer

Automatic Candle Snuffer

A little candlelight can really enhance the mood. But an unattended candle will burn all the way to the bottom. Rescue & Restore shows us a clever 19th-century invention that could be placed atop a burning candle and that automatically cut off its oxygen supply after it had burned for a set amount of time.

Restoring a Vintage Foosball Table

Restoring a Vintage Foosball Table

Table football aka table soccer aka Foosball dates back to the early 20th century. MW Restoration got their hands on example from the 1920s that needed some TLC. The table was in extremely rough shape and had a gaping hole in its hardboard field. But by the time MW was done, the game looked as good as new.

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1948 Bowling Trick Shots

1948 Bowling Trick Shots

Long before Dude Perfect was posting trick shot videos on YouTube, bowler Andy Varipapa was knocking down pins with such skill that he could target specific pins on two separate lanes at the same time, throw backward strikes, and even bowl with his foot. This vintage newsreel’s voiceover is as entertaining as the bowling.

Inventions We Don’t Use Anymore

Inventions We Don’t Use Anymore

It hasn’t been that long since people used landline telephones, tape players, and VCRs on an everyday basis. But like so many other devices, they’ve been replaced by smartphones or other technology. Rhetty for History looks at these and other inventions which were popular in the 20th century and are now obsolete.

Why Boxers Used to Stand Like This

Why Boxers Used to Stand Like This

Vintage pictures of boxers often show fighters standing in this silly “fisticuffs” stance. But that position served a purpose, as Primo – Boxing explains in this short video. Basically, the lower arm protected the torso since gloveless fighters took way more body blows and aimed for the head less frequently to prevent broken hands.

Restoring a Mechanical Horse Racing Game

Restoring a Mechanical Horse Racing Game

We’ve always been fascinated by mechanical arcade games. Old Things Never Die shows off a vintage game where players placed bets on horses racing around in circles. It required extensive restoration work to fix its mechanism and return it to its former glory. It’s wonderful to see how fast it spins now.

Bentley Through The Years Drag Race

Bentley Through The Years Drag Race

Bentleys are among the most extravagant cars ever made. Carwow lined up four of the British luxury cars to see how their performance has evolved. The drag race between a modern Continental GT Speed, a 1990s Continental R Mulliner, a 1980s Bentley Turbo R, and a 93-year-old Bentley Blower goes just as you’d expect.

Driving an Analog Tank Simulator

Driving an Analog Tank Simulator

These days, the military uses powerful computers and high-end graphics cards to simulate missions. But in the 1970s, one of the ways to simulate driving a tank was using a miniature city, a motion camera rig, and a remote screen that displayed the first-person perspective to the pilot. Tom Scott took this vintage sim for a ride.

Restoring a Mini Soccer Game

Restoring a Mini Soccer Game

We love watching videos of old things being made as good as new. In this clip, Old Things Never Die got their hands on a vintage mechanical soccer game, disassembled it, sandblasted off the paint and rust, fabricated custom replacement parts, and painstakingly repainted its playfield and players.

Restoring a Mini Flamethrower

Restoring a Mini Flamethrower

We’re not sure what this compact German flamethrower was originally used for, but it is a fascinating bit of kit. When SlivkiShow got their hands on it, it was in pretty rough shape, but by the end of this video, it’s looking and working as well as it ever has.

Fractal Jaw Vise

Fractal Jaw Vise

Hand Tool Rescue shows off an amazing workbench vice that can hold oddly-shaped objects. Made by Mantle & Co. in the early 20th century, the vice uses a series of rotating semi-circlular jaws to hold items firmly in place. See the fully-restored vice at 34:00, then check out the original patent for the design.

The Future of the 1920s

The Future of the 1920s

It’s always fun to look back and see what prior generations thought the future would be like. The1920sChannel rewinds a full century to explore some of the predictions that showed up in Science and Invention magazine. If they were right, we’d be flying in blimps and living in underground cities guarded by creepy robot police.

Slang of the 1920s

Slang of the 1920s

Every decade, the words we use to describe things evolve. The 1920s Channel rewinds 100 years to examine the slang words and phrases that were in vogue at the time, including classics like “whoopee,” “zozzled,” and “heebie jeepbies.” We really want to bring back “and how!”

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Restoring a Vintage Lottery Machine

Restoring a Vintage Lottery Machine

After impressing us by restoring a vintage pinball machine, Old Things Never Die is back with another project video. This time, they took an antique coin-operated lottery game that tumbled tiny balls inside a metal sphere, then dropped one behind a window at its bottom. The color of the selected ball corresponds to a prize.

Manual Typewriter Typing Robot

Manual Typewriter Typing Robot

If you’ve ever played with a vintage manual typewriter, you know how hard it can be just to hit those mechanical keys with enough force. JBV Creative built a custom robot that uses 3D-printed “fingers” and servo motors to type text and ASCII art on an old Remington Rand Office Riter. Money shot at 15:34.

Restoring a Vintage Pinball Table

Restoring a Vintage Pinball Table

Modern pinball machines have hundreds of electronic components and complex wiring harnesses. But back in the day, pinball relied on gravity and simple obstacles made from nails and bent metal. Old Things Never Die got their hands on a time-worn 1930s pinball table and painstakingly restored it to like-new condition.

Package Tying Machine

Package Tying Machine

We always enjoy seeing how industrial machines are engineered. In this video from author and maker of things Theodore Gray, he shows off a 1963 Bunn packaging machine that was designed to quickly wrap items with string. What makes it really interesting is how it ties a knot and cuts the twine perfectly every time.

The Terrifying Mr. Potato Head

The Terrifying Mr. Potato Head

Since the 1960s, Mr. Potato Head toys have come with a fake potato body made of plastic. But when they first came out in the 1950s, they were strictly bring-your-own tuber. Vintage TV Commercials dug up this 1952 Hasbro promo that shows just how creepy and weird looking the original Potato Heads could be.

San Francisco: Before the Great Quake

San Francisco: Before the Great Quake

On April 18, 1906, San Francisco was devastated by a horrific 7.9 magnitude earthquake. This fascinating footage of Market Street gives us a glimpse of what it looked like just four days before the quake hit and leveled much of the city. NASS used AI tech to enhance and colorize the film, and added ambient sound effects.

Video Through an Old Lens

Video Through an Old Lens

Camera technology has come a very long way since World War I, though a lens is generally still just a lens. Photographerr Mathieu Stern decided to see what kind of video he could capture with a lens he snatched from a 100-year-old Eastman Kodak camera. The footage is quite good, with a dreamy and warm quality to it.

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The Special Effects of Karel Zeman

The Special Effects of Karel Zeman

This excerpt from the documentary short The Special Effects of Karel Zeman showcases some of the late Czech filmmaker’s wildly inventive methods for creating movie magic with miniatures, fluids, smoke, forced perspective, and other camera tricks. You can watch the full documentary on YouTube.

Silent Movie Special Effects

Silent Movie Special Effects

Today’s movie VFX rely on green screen and CGI, but in silent movie times, neither of those existed. Pedro Cinemaxunga created this fascinating analysis of vintage moviemaking techniques that shows how in-camera effects managed to fake out audiences. We always thought Harold Lloyd was really hanging from that building.

Restoring a Vintage Spinner Game

Restoring a Vintage Spinner Game

You might think this object is a rusty bicycle wheel on a stand, but it’s a vintage game of chance that decides who will pay for the next round of drinks. Old Things Never Die tore it down to its components, stripped off the rust, and restored it to original condition. The clicky sound it makes when spun is so satisfying.

Inside the Museum of Soviet Arcade Machines

Inside the Museum of Soviet Arcade Machines

With locations in Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia, the Museum of Soviet Arcade Machines is filled with vintage arcade machines that date back to the Soviet era. Incredibly, the machines have all been restored and are playable. Baklykov. Live takes us on a tour of the museum, its machines, and other artifacts.

Las Vegas c. 1975

Las Vegas c. 1975

Today, the Las Vegas Strip is an ever-changing landscape of mega-resorts. This footage from the Kino Library gives us a glimpse at the Strip as it appeared in 1975. While Caesars and the Flamingo live on, most other properties on display have since been bulldozed. Though you can still find their signs at The Neon Museum.

The Sure Defender

The Sure Defender

Forgotten Weapons takes a look at an unusual piece that dates back to the 1860s. The Sure Defender combined brass knuckles, a wavy dagger, and a single-shot pistol in one. It wasn’t the most practical weapon, but it certainly gave users a variety of options.

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