Awesome The Slow Mo Guys

If Every Second Lasted an Hour

If Every Second Lasted an Hour

How might we experience time if everything slowed down to 1/3600th of its current speed? With the help of a Phantom TMX 7510 high-speed camera, Gav from The Slow Mo Guys gives us a small taste of what life might be like at 90,000 frames per second. Want more? Here’s a guy falling into a pool for an hour.

Ultra-Slow-Motion Wine Glass Shatter

Ultra-Slow-Motion Wine Glass Shatter

You can make a wine glass shatter by playing a sound loudly and at its resonant frequency. But what exactly is going on when this happens? Gav from The Slow Mo Guys tested out the experiment in front of the Phantom TMX 7510 high-speed camera, capturing the wobbling and exploding glass at a crazy 187,500 fps.

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High-Speed Robot, Slow-Mo Video

High-Speed Robot, Slow-Mo Video

Gav from The Slow Mo Guys mounted a fancy high-speed camera to the arm of an agile and precise robot. Combined with a remote triggering mechanism, he was able to capture some unique perspectives on their subject – a colorful fountain made from diet soda, Mentos, and their sponsor MiO’s instant drinks.

Shattering Glass in Super Slow-Mo

Shattering Glass in Super Slow-Mo

Unless you have a beater you don’t care about, we don’t recommend tossing a spark plug at your car window. Instead, we suggest watching The Slow Mo Guys video, in which Gav smashes sheets of tempered glass and captures the breakage at speeds up to 800,000 frames per second.

Slow-Mo Submarine Explosion

Slow-Mo Submarine Explosion

Blowing up a real submarine would be costly and impractical, so Gav from The Slow Mo Guys did the next best thing. He took a scale model of a sub, placed it inside a fish tank, and set off mini depth charges. The exterior shots were done with Phantom cameras, but the underwater shots were done with a GoPro Hero9 Black.

Pinball Machine Slow-Motion

Pinball Machine Slow-Motion

We’ve seen how pinball machines are made. Now, thanks to Gavin of The Slow Mo Guys, we can see exactly how they work as they kick steel balls around. He spent some quality time with Jersey Jack’s tricked-out Willy Wonka pinball machine to observe how its electro-mechanical playfield components work.

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