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Awesome Motors

Longest LEGO Chain-Drive Machine

Longest LEGO Chain-Drive Machine

A while back, we checked out a complicated machine that used LEGO Technic parts to pull a chain around a bunch of gears. That one was built by Brick Technology. The Brick Machines took the idea and expanded on it with a ridiculously complicated machine driven by a continuous chain built from 1,184 LEGO chain links.

Tentacle Kinetic Sculpture

Tentacle Kinetic Sculpture

Berlin-based artist Florian Goerlitz makes incredible mechanical artworks that have appeared in large installations and at festivals. This smaller piece is notable because it creates so much movement using just a single motor. Made almost entirely from wooden gears, it has three arms that move around its center, undulating like tentacles on an octopus.

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LEGO 1×1 Gear Train

LEGO 1×1 Gear Train

Today’s most satisfying video comes in the form of this clip from the Brick Experiment Channel. Their goal? Create the longest possible chain of 1×1 LEGO Technic gears while retaining the same gear ratio from start to finish. We’re impressed that a single motor can drive that many gears.

10 Kinds of Motorized LEGO Doors

10 Kinds of Motorized LEGO Doors

Sliding, swinging, garage, barn. There are lots of different kinds of doors. The Brick Experiment Channel shows us how to make various kinds of doors using LEGO Technic parts and how to automate them to open and close with the twist of a dial. That sectional garage door works a lot like a real one does.

Motorized Standing Desk Drives on Wheels

Motorized Standing Desk Drives on Wheels

While a standing desk is better for your back than a seated one, it won’t help you get any exercise – unless you can walk while you work. That’s the idea behind this Flexispot┬ástanding desk modded by Joel Creates. To prove that his motorized desk is a practical workstation, Joel edited this entire video while the desk was in motion.

Starting a Massive Diesel Engine

Starting a Massive Diesel Engine

Think car engines are impressive? Watch and have your mind blown by the enormous B&W 2000 8-cylinder diesel engine as it starts up and its massive pistons move. HD1080ide posted footage of this engineering marvel that was the world’s largest engine from 1933 until the 1960s. It’s now permanently installed at Denmark’s Diesel House.

The Fastest LEGO Car

The Fastest LEGO Car

James from Project Air likes to make things that go fast. Recently, he produced a series of experimental builds to see which method of propulsion would make the fastest possible LEGO vehicle. Which will hit the top speed? Multiple LEGO motors, rocket engines, or a brushless motor from an R/C sports car?

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LEGO Minifig Spin Test

LEGO Minifig Spin Test

LEGO machine builder Dr. Engine wanted to see how fast he could spin a Minifigure, so he rigged up multiple Technic motors and gears with a goal of spinning the little guy at up to 10,000 RPM. If Minifigs could lose their LEGO lunch, this here would do it.

Making a DIY Hovercraft

Making a DIY Hovercraft

A hovercraft might sound like a complicated piece of equipment to build from scratch, but Project Air shows us how it’s possible to build one at home using wood, foam board, a plastic tarp, and duct tape. The key to the build is the powerful lift motors. He also had some help from his dad and fellow maker Matt from DIY Perks.

Making Patterns with LEGO Gears

Making Patterns with LEGO Gears

Rapidly spinning objects can result in some cool, Spirograph-like patterns. LEGO mechanical builder Yoshihito Isogawa shows how different arrangements of LEGO Technic gears create different geometric patterns when spun in front of a camera’s lens. It would be interesting to see some larger and more complicated designs.

World’s Fastest Roomba

World’s Fastest Roomba

A Roomba has a top speed of about 1.1 mph. Electrosync knew he could do better. After cleaning out the dirt and dust from a Roomba’s vacuuming duties, gutted the robotic vacuum and installed two high-performance RC car motors. The two-wheeler can spin incredibly quickly, but how fast is it in a straight line?

32 Stepper Motor Orchestra

32 Stepper Motor Orchestra

A 32-piece orchestra needs need a pretty big stage for all of those musicians and their instruments. Jonathan Kayne has solved this problem by replacing those pesky humans with stepper motors. The members of his band never talk back, and they play everything from All-Star to Piano Man to The Mandalorian theme.

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Powering an E-Bike with a Drone Motor

Powering an E-Bike with a Drone Motor

The motors used in electric-powered bicycles are usually pretty heavy. Engineer Tom Stanton wanted to see if it would be possible to rig up a tiny but strong 1kW motor from a drone to propel a bike. The trick was creating a series of gears and belts to reduce the motor’s high rotational speed while increasing its torque.

Making a Supercapacitor Electric Bike

Making a Supercapacitor Electric Bike

Supercapacitors have one big advantage over batteries – they charge much faster. But they also discharge energy more quickly, limiting operating range. This makes them suboptimal for EVs. Engineer Tom Stanton built a supercapacitor pack and drive unit for an E-bike to see just how it stacks up to battery power.

Turbine Umbrella Hat

Turbine Umbrella Hat

Maker Ivan Miranda lives in a beautiful place in Spain. But he hates when it rains there, and he doesn’t like carrying an umbrella. So he set about the task of engineering a motorized helmet that uses a powerful motor and a turbine to blow the rain away from his body. And yes, it works in real rain.

PacMotor Dual Kayak Motor

PacMotor Dual Kayak Motor

The PacMotor lets you enjoy kayaking without physical exertion. Its adjustable frame attaches to the rear of most kayaks, propelling a 7.5-foot kayak up to 6 mph. Its two motors steer with a waterproof remote joystick controller, and its props can be lifted out of the water when you want to paddle, or when getting close to land.

LEGO V12 Engine @40,000 RPM

LEGO V12 Engine @40,000 RPM

LEGO builder Mad Brick created a working replica of the block, crankshaft, and pistons of a V12 engine. Then he lubed it up and connected the engine to a powerful motor, which spun up to as much as 40,000 RPM. It worked great until the pistons started flying.

LEGO Water Vortex

LEGO Water Vortex

It doesn’t take too much to create a vortex in a bucket of water, but it’s still fun to see how just a couple of Technic motors and a few gears can be cobbled together can produce this popular physics demo. Those minifigs got to go for quite the ride when Brick Experiment Channel cranked things up to 11.

Desktop Helicopter Rotor

Desktop Helicopter Rotor

While we’re perplexed by Liberman’s musical selections, we are impressed with what he was able to construct on his workbench. Watch as he puts together a working model of a helicopter rotor from plywood, rulers, popsicle sticks, and off-the-shelf hardware. We love how it even can adjust the angle of its blades.

What’s Inside a Tesla Motor?

What’s Inside a Tesla Motor?

The What’s Inside? channel presents one of its more costly videos, as they rip apart open one of the powerful drive motors from a Tesla Model S to see all of the gears, goo, and other goodies inside. This particular rear motor dates back to 2012, and was purchased off of eBay.

Mendocino Levitating Motor

Mendocino Levitating Motor

Physicsfun presents a brief demonstration of one of the more interesting motors we’ve seen – the Mendocino motor uses magnets and a solar energy source to levitate as it spins. You can pick up a similar version for your own desk over on Amazon.

Manned Multirotor Flight

Manned Multirotor Flight

AmazingDIYProjects spent countless hours building this crazy loud electric flying contraption using dozens of drone motors. He captured footage of the marvelous machine’s maiden manned flight. Second flight starts at 15:30, and POV footage at 22:30. (Thanks Rob!)

Piezoelectric Motors

Piezoelectric Motors

Applied Science takes a look at an intriguing bit of tech that uses piezoelectric waves to move objects. This allows for low-profile, hubless, magnet-free motors and theoretically could create motors which aren’t round. The motor shown in the demo is from PCBMotors.

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