THE BEST Metal

Lowball 2: The Pinch

Lowball 2: The Pinch

A truly stunning piece of drinkware unlike any other. Each of Discommon’s Lowball 2 whisky tumblers is CNC machined from a block of aerospace-grade aluminum, and features precision engineered geometry and textures for an optimal grip and to minimize drips.

Flying Fidget Spinner

Flying Fidget Spinner

For Inventables’ fidget spinner challenge, Giaco Whatever decided to see if he could make one that could float in mid air. After a bunch of experimentation, he was able to get it to work by placing it between two opposing magnetic fields, and spinning it for stabilization.

Advertisement

Apple Watch Steampunk Covers

Apple Watch Steampunk Covers

Transform your basic black Apple Watch into a wearable piece of neo-futurist art with one of Joy Complex’s metal covers. They’re available in cast bronze or silver with a patina finsh, or shiny or distressed cast copper. You can find the watch bands shown over on Amazon.

Cold-casting 3D Prints

Cold-casting 3D Prints

Designer Paul Braddock of the Mold3D Channel demonstrates how to use objects made with a 3D printer to create silicone molds for casting items from a mix of metal powder and resin, giving them a sturdy and substantial part with a weathered metallic look with actual rust.

Melting Aluminum Wheels

Melting Aluminum Wheels

In a scene that plays out like the end of Terminator 2, watch as these disused aluminum car rims are melted down in a hot furnace, so they can be reincarnated into other products. We kept waiting for those screaming heads to start popping out of the molten metal.

Making Fidget Spinners

Making Fidget Spinners

Those fidget spinner thingies are starting to turn up everywhere, but rather than buy some cheap mass-produced toy, our old pal Engineer BrunS decided to make some of his own. There are few things more satisfying than watching metal shavings go flying as it’s milled.

Making Million-Layer Damascus Steel

Making Million-Layer Damascus Steel

Appropriately named metalsmith Alec Steele starts out by welding 31 layers of steel together, then heats and repeatedly hammers them together so many times that he eventually hits one million layers. He later turned the resulting Damascus steel cube into a karambit knife.

Molten Copper in Slow Mo

Molten Copper in Slow Mo

One of the few self-illuminating materials to find its way in front of The Slow Mo Guys‘ lens is this liquid copper being poured at more than 1200ºF. We’re sure glad they didn’t splash any on their schmancy high-speed camera.

Hollow Dice

Hollow Dice

Truly unique six-sided dice which have an open void in their centers. They’re precision machined from anodized aluminum, and weigh just 1.5 grams each. Their unique pip design and balanced weight distribution ensures statistically fair rolls too.

Gallium vs. Aluminum

Gallium vs. Aluminum

Over the years, YouTuber NurdRage has demonstrated how pouring liquid gallium onto aluminum can cause catastrophic failure of the normally durable, lightweight metal. Watch as the stuff causes a heat sink, sheet metal, and even a baseball bat lose its strength.

Brass Jack Desktop Puzzle

Brass Jack Desktop Puzzle

Each of Craighill’s metal desk puzzles does double duty as a pint-sized work of art and a brain-teaser. The six-piece puzzle measures 3″ x 3″ x 3″, weighs about a pound, and is milled from solid cartridge brass in Massachusetts.

Machining a Swiss Cube

Machining a Swiss Cube

This video from the Crown Point High School machine shop works on multiple levels. It’s not only a cool demonstration of how to create a complicated metal sculpture, but we’re also convinced the school has developed the ability to time travel back to the 1980s.

Bottoms up Shot Glasses

Bottoms up Shot Glasses

Owen & Fred’s stainless steel shot glasses each hold 2oz of your favorite spirit, and are die stamped with an appropriate cheer of “Bottoms Up” in the bottom that you can read as you prepare to gulp down your drink.

Advertisement

Making a Coil Spring

Making a Coil Spring

If you’ve ever wondered how they make those giant springs used in the suspension systems of cars, check out this footage of a molten hot rod of steel as it’s bent around a moving cylinder, then quenched in a vat of oil to harden it.

Larger-than-life Samurai Sculpture

Larger-than-life Samurai Sculpture

Thailand sculptor Mari9art’s incredible build is made from recycled car parts and scrap steel. It measures 2.2m tall (~7.2 ft), and includes free door-to-port shipping, though getting it to your house might be a challenge from there. His lifesize T-Rex is even more mindblowing.

Poligon Metal Calendars

Poligon Metal Calendars

Poligon’s etched metal calendars not only look cool, but offer a satisfying feature – the ability to punch out each day as it passes. Choose from a foldable triangular design or a flat version with hidden magnets for fridge mounting.

Exotic Metal Orbs

Exotic Metal Orbs

Progressive Products uses precision machining to create these perfectly smooth desktop spheres from brass, copper, stainless steel, and titanium. Each one unscrews at its equator to reveal a small storage space inside.

Metal Rod Bottle Opener

Metal Rod Bottle Opener

We love the simplicity of FutureRelic’s rod-shaped bottle opener. Its shape reminds us of keychain flashlights, but this tool is perfect for opening a cold brew. Available in copper-finish bronze, brass, or stainless steel, with a knurled grip. Measured 2.25″ long.

Astronoid: Air

Astronoid: Air

Metal is home to some of the most genre-blurring artists, but Boston-based quintet Astronoid takes the bar and throws it to space. Blood Music calls the band’s product “dream thrash” – melodic vocals rising over thick shredding, like emo aged to perfection.

Liquid Metal Watch

Liquid Metal Watch

This unique timepiece from Y. Kimura and Seahope Ltd. features a display which tells time using blobs of liquid metal. The metal moves freely, then magnets under its face pull them into place to display the current hours and minutes. Comes in silver, black, or gold.

Advertisement

Casting an Aluminum Skillet

Casting an Aluminum Skillet

Sure, you could go to the store and buy a skillet for about 10 bucks, but you won’t get the satisfaction that Tito4re got when he made his own from scratch, using a sand mold and some molten aluminum. Though he did need another skillet to make the mold too.

Additive/Subtractive Combo Machine

Additive/Subtractive Combo Machine

Check out this footage of the DMG MORI Lasertec 65 3D, an amazing marvel of modern engineering which is capable of first building up rough metal forms using laser deposition welding, then switching heads to precisely mill and drill them into finished parts.

Bicycle Gear Lamp

Bicycle Gear Lamp

Artist Toby Boswell of Pale Rider Handmade has perfected a metalworking process to create these wonderful spherical lamps from recycled bicycle gears. Measures ~15″ dia. and sits on a wood base. Toby also offers the spheres by themselves, and a pendant is in the works.

Making Metal Matches

Making Metal Matches

Metalworker Engineer BrunS walks us through the painstaking process of machining a block of aluminum into a metal matchbox with a sliding drawer, then making tiny brass matches to go along with. They don’t actually burn, but they still look amazing.

3D Printed Steel Bike

3D Printed Steel Bike

Students at the Netherlands’ Delft University of Technology and 3D printing company MX3D programmed a welding robot to “print” the cage structure of this awesome and unique bicycle frame. We love the open and organic design, though it’s probably still quite heavy.

ADVERTISEMENT

Use Arrow Keys ← → for Faster Navigation | Keyboard Shortcuts: OnOff

Home | About | Suggest | Contact | Team | Links | Privacy | Disclosure
Advertise | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Sites We Like

Awesome Stuff: The Awesomer | Gadgets, Games & Geeks: Technabob | Cool Cars: 95Octane
Site Design & Content © 2008-2019 Awesomer Media / The Awesomer™
Visit our Friends at: Not Always Right