THE BEST Magnets

Spinning Magnets

Spinning Magnets

Magnetic Games presents another wildly satisfying video. This time, he uses a bunch of spherical and tubular magnets to create a series of gradually more complex spinning kinetic sculptures. It’s equal parts ASMR, physics experiment, and visual fun.

Magic of Magnetism & Inductors

Magic of Magnetism & Inductors

Electrical engineer Mehdi Sadaghdar of ElectroBOOM presents a series of simple demonstrations involving magnets, batteries, and wires, each of which might seem magical, but can all be easily explained by science. He might have a goofy approach to teaching, but if you stick around, you might learn a thing or two.

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Giant Magnetic Balls

Giant Magnetic Balls

Magnet fanatic Magnetic Games got their hands on 64 oversize 26mm (~1.02″) neodymium spheres. These giant-sized balls are much harder to work with (and more dangerous) than their smaller brethren, but they do look like fun. They’re not cheap, but you can buy some here.

Magnetic Disassembly Zen

Magnetic Disassembly Zen

Despite their YouTube channel’s name, The Philadelphia Robot Factory has significantly more magnets than robots. In this highly satisfying video, they disassemble a hefty hexagonal structure they made from 50,000 individual magnetic spheres, layer by layer. Now enjoy the same in reverse.

GraviTrax Marble Run Kits

GraviTrax Marble Run Kits

Puzzle maker Ravensburger’s kits are a blast for kids and kids at heart, letting you easily assemble fast-moving and complex marble runs. Modular components encourage experimentation, and include loops, magnetic cannons, and other tricks. The starter set comes with 122 pieces, while we’d go for the 240-piece XXL set.

Full Windsor Magware Utensils

Full Windsor Magware Utensils

Full Windsor, maker of the Muncher multi-utensil, extends its lineup with these slimline aluminum eating tools. This literal flatware has embedded magnets and couplers for easy stacking in your drawer, backpack, or for grouping them together at the table. Carry them every day, and cut down on environmental waste.

How Magnets are Made

How Magnets are Made

Discovery UK digs into the How It’s Made archives for this brief look at the process that goes into creating traditional magnets. After melting a cocktail of various metals in an electrical induction furnace, the fiery metal is poured into sand molds, then cooled, separated, and charged with multiple electromagnetic fields.

Slow-Mo Magnet Smashes

Slow-Mo Magnet Smashes

Magnets and destruction. What’s not to like? Magnetic Games rigged up a variety of fragile panels in front of a powerful neodymium magnet, then launched a steel sphere in its direction, and captured the smashy goodness in slow motion. Don’t try this at home without proper eye and face protection.

Glowing Neoballs

Glowing Neoballs

Vat19 shows off some of the fun things you can do with these glow-in-the-dark magnetic construction spheres. Each pack comes with 216, 0.5 cm diameter neodymium balls, but if you pick up 24 packages or so, you can build yourself a magnetic lightsaber, just like they did.

Self-Solving Rubik’s Cube Floats

Self-Solving Rubik’s Cube Floats

After wowing us with his self-solving Rubik’s Cube, maker Human Controller takes things to another level by making his miniature puzzle machine magnetically levitate while solving itself. We’ve been assured there are no visual tricks here.

Tool Magnetizer/Demagnetizer

Tool Magnetizer/Demagnetizer

Want to make sure your screws and bolts don’t slip when you’re driving them? Jakemy’s handy shop accessory can magnetize your steel tools like screwdrivers, drill bits, tweezers, and anything else that slides through its slots. It’s available in small and large sizes for various tools.

MagHold V-Pad Adjustable Magnets

MagHold V-Pad Adjustable Magnets

Magnets are extremely useful for welding steel, as they can be used to hold pieces securely together without clamps. Strong Hand Tools magnets are unique thanks to their double-jointed design, which allows them to hold round, flat, or square metal parts at any angle, and in a snap.

Magnetic Balls vs Monster Magnets

Magnetic Balls vs Monster Magnets

Magnet enthusiast Magnetic Games decided to see what would happen when he introduced a bunch of his small, Buckyballs-style spheres to some of his incredibly powerful neodymium monolith magnets. The impacts are quite spectacular, and especially neat to watch in slow motion.

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Satisfying Magnetic Cubes

Satisfying Magnetic Cubes

Magnet fanatic Magnetic Games shows us how to build cube structures using neodymium metal rods and spheres. He starts out with a single cube, then builds on it to create a much more substantial cube. The sounds the magnets make as they snap into place are wonderfully satisfying too.

Building a Magnetic Eiffel Tower

Building a Magnetic Eiffel Tower

Lover of all things with magnets, Magnetic Games used a hundreds of magnetized girders and spheres to construct an impressive desktop replica of the Eiffel Tower. The video is both visually hypnotic and serves as a great bit of ASMR as well.

Silwy Magnetic Drinkware

Silwy Magnetic Drinkware

Silwy’s unique plastic cups and crystal glasses have magnets in their bottoms. They work with the included non-slip magnetic gel pad coasters to ensure that your drinks don’t spill on their way. Touch of Modern has some on sale as of this writing. Also on Amazon.

Super Mario Fridge Magnets

Super Mario Fridge Magnets

Nintendo fans, dress up your fridge with your own custom level from Super Mario Bros. This set comes with 80 8-bit magnets from the Mushroom Kingdom, including bricks, pipes, gold coins, Koopas, Goombas, Mario, and Luigi. Just look out for those Piranha Plants.

Kit Atlas Face Magnets

Kit Atlas Face Magnets

Etsy store Kit Atlas makes personalized portrait magnets. Send a photo of a face – even pets – and they’ll draw, color, cut, and turn it into a magnet by hand. You’ll approve the sketch before it gets turned into a magnet, and can order up to six magnets at a time.

Magnetic Fields in Slow-motion

Magnetic Fields in Slow-motion

To show how easy it is to visualize magnetic fields, Magnetic Games tossed a super-strong neodymium magnet into a pile of magnetite sand sitting on an impromptu trampoline. As the magnet and particles fly through the air, the patterns emerge.

Ferrofluid Magnetic Display

Ferrofluid Magnetic Display

Bob Products makes these large-scale professional displays which use electromagnets to play with the strange and unusual properties of ferrofluid. The systems can be programmed to manipulate the magnets and fluid while displaying lighting and sound effects.

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GoodHangups

GoodHangups

GoodHangups let you hang posters, cards, and other light items on a variety of surfaces, neatly and without frames. It consists of a set of small magnets and magnetic stickers, which are easy to remove and are reusable. Sold packs from 8 to 100 pieces.

Mendocino Levitating Motor

Mendocino Levitating Motor

Physicsfun presents a brief demonstration of one of the more interesting motors we’ve seen – the Mendocino motor uses magnets and a solar energy source to levitate as it spins. You can pick up a similar version for your own desk over on Amazon.

Cleaning a Vase with Magnets

Cleaning a Vase with Magnets

From the “why didn’t we think of this?” file, TipHero shows off a simple, yet effective way to scrub the inside of hard to reach glass vessels by sticking magnets inside of a pair of cut up sponges – one inside the glass, and one on the outside.

Magnetic Sculptures in Reverse

Magnetic Sculptures in Reverse

The Magnetic Games channel presents a fantastically satisfying video in which they play back the destruction of various magnetic sculptures in reverse. Put your headphones on, and the audio just makes it that much more entertaining.

The Meisner Effect

The Meisner Effect

Harvard Natural Sciences presents a nifty experiment that shows how a liquid nitrogen-cooled metal substance (YBCO) can cause a neodymium magnet to levitate. As the disc cools, it becomes a superconductor, causing the Meissner effect to kick in.

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