Awesome Experiments

Drying Firewood with a Hydraulic Press

Drying Firewood with a Hydraulic Press

When you want to start a fire, it’s important that you have dry wood. Logs that have been sitting around and getting rained on are very difficult to keep lit. The Hydraulic Press Channel wanted to see if they could use mechanical force to extract enough water from damp timber that it would be dry enough to light.

How to Make a Glowing Penny Light Bulb

How to Make a Glowing Penny Light Bulb

If you heat up a penny with a blow torch then lower it over a puddle of acetone, the reaction with the vapors will make the penny glow like a dim red lightbulb. NileRed shows off the reaction and points out that it must be done with a copper penny and not one with zinc or it will melt. And remember, chemistry is dangerous.

Advertisement

This Is Not Perpetual Motion (Again)

This Is Not Perpetual Motion (Again)

There are countless videos on the Internet that claim to demonstrate machines that can generate their own energy and operate in perpetuity. Don’t believe the hype. In this video from The Action Lab, he shows off one such trick, which uses hidden electromagnets to make a sphere look like it’s spinning on its own.

Pouring Molten Aluminum from 50 Feet Up

Pouring Molten Aluminum from 50 Feet Up

The Backyard Scientist conducts another ill-advised and dangerous experiment by loading himself and a bucket of molten aluminum into a cherry picker, then ascending to 50 feet before pouring the metal into an aquarium on the ground. We’d like to say this was for science, but it’s clearly just for the spectacle.

Tennis Balls vs. Razor Racket

Tennis Balls vs. Razor Racket

A normal tennis racket has gut, nylon, or polyester strings. But what if you replaced those strings with razor blades and then fired the ball at the racket with a powerful air cannon at 500+ MPH? Tyler Bell demonstrates exactly that, dicing up tennis balls in a fraction of a second with his deadly looking rig.

Magically Healing Cut

Magically Healing Cut

James over at The Action Lab shows off a neat series of chemical reactions that make it look like he cut his hand, then miraculously heals it. The combination of ferric chloride and potassium thiocyanite produce the deep red blood color, while the addition of sodium fluoride makes it turn transparent again.

Syringe vs. Tesla Coil

Syringe vs. Tesla Coil

Tesla coils give us one of the few controlled ways to see electricity. Apparently, if you stick a nail into a plastic syringe, point it at a live tesla coil, and pull its plunger that it would extract the electric plasma into its barrel. Original footage from ElectroBOOM.

Living in 3rd Person

Living in 3rd Person

Video games that play in a 3rd-person perspective help you understand your place within the world and let you see what your character looks like. With the help of a video rig and VR goggles, Ryan Trahan lived his own life from a 3rd-person view – and he did it for two days. We probably would have thrown up after 20 minutes.

Shooting Things Through Spinning Fans

Shooting Things Through Spinning Fans

It’s pretty easy to toss something into a spinning fan and watch it get smashed. But how feasible is it to send an object flying through multiple fan blades and have it emerge from the other end? Leave it to the guys from How Ridiculous to find out.

The Spinning Ball Experiment

The Spinning Ball Experiment

James from The Action Lab shows off a physics demonstration that had us scratching our heads at first. While it appears that the ball bearing inside of this glass beaker will spin forever without adding energy, there’s a perfectly rational explanation of what’s going on. The Egg of Columbus demo is pretty neat too.

Wooden Saw Blade

Wooden Saw Blade

There’s a good reason that most saw blades are made from steel. Regardless, the Kurahito Craft channel wanted to see if they could make a circular saw blade out of wood and use it to cut things. It makes quick work of paper and thin sheets of plastic, but can it cut its own kind? Let the wood-on-wood battle begin!

Racing with Hydrogen

Racing with Hydrogen

Chemistry can be pretty awesome (and dangerous at times). MEL Science show off an energetic reaction that happens when you soak aluminum foil balls in sodium hydroxide, then expose them to oxygen and a flame. By placing the balls inside of a tube, the combustion causes them to race around like tiny cars on fire.

Hand-Powered LEGO Speed Experiments

Hand-Powered LEGO Speed Experiments

It’s pretty easy to get a LEGO wheel spinning fast with a motor, but what about with human power? The Brick Experiment Channel set up a LEGO flywheel and gear mechanism which he proceeded to spin using only his fingers and a piece of string. He measured the rotations using a laser and a marker to calculate its speed.

Advertisement

100-Cylinder LEGO Car

100-Cylinder LEGO Car

Most cars have a 4-, 6-, or 8-cylinder engine. Even a $3 Million Bugatti tops out at 16 cylinders. But this LEGO vehicle has an insane 100-cylinder powertrain. Brick Experiment Channel built this monster which is so long that it needs a 10-point turn to turn a corner. Fortunately, there is a fix – stacking the engine vertically.

Power Drill vs. Line-X

Power Drill vs. Line-X

For those unfamiliar with Line-X, it’s a heavy-duty coating used for truck bed liners, fender flares, and other vehicle equipment. Tools in Action wanted to see what would happen if they sprayed the coating onto a spinning power drill. The resulting mess could pass for a piece of modern art.

LEGO Minifig Spin Test

LEGO Minifig Spin Test

LEGO machine builder Dr. Engine wanted to see how fast he could spin a Minifigure, so he rigged up multiple Technic motors and gears with a goal of spinning the little guy at up to 10,000 RPM. If Minifigs could lose their LEGO lunch, this here would do it.

LEGO Flywheel Car

LEGO Flywheel Car

GazR’s Extreme Brick Machines built this unique LEGO Technic vehicle that stores energy in a flywheel. A rig consisting of 21 Powered-Up L motors and six Smart Hubs transfers power to the flywheel, then the car can continue driving on its own. It doesn’t go very far but has enough torque to climb a hill.

How Cold is Yakutsk?

How Cold is Yakutsk?

With a record low temperature of -64.4°C (-83.9°F), Yakutsk, Russia, is known as the coldest city in the world. Local resident Kiun B braved the outdoors on a typically chilly winter day to perform six experiments to show just how quickly stuff freezes there. We need to try that banana hammer trick here in Chicago.

Gas Powering Things That Shouldn’t Be

Gas Powering Things That Shouldn’t Be

After playing around with a gasoline-powered pogo stick you could buy in the 1970s, The Backyard Scientist wanted to see what other kinds of things you could add a gas engine to that don’t need one. So he took a tiny nitromethane-powered engine and revved up a desk fan, a USB charger, and a toothbrush.

Baseball Bat Helicopter

Baseball Bat Helicopter

Inspired by Smarter Every Day’s powerful home run machine, the guys from How Ridiculous wanted to try and beat Destin’s 717-foot batting record. So they teamed up with aeronautical engineering firm Innovaero to a create a batting machine that imitates a helicopter’s rotor blades. This thing is terrifying as it spins up.

Advertisement

LEGO Car vs. Road Gaps

LEGO Car vs. Road Gaps

After building LEGO cars that can climb obstacles, the Brick Experiment Channel is back with another vehicular test. This time, the goal was to build LEGO cars that can cross a gap in the road. There are many variables at play in making the most capable vehicle, from wheel size and count to frame length and weight distribution.

Driving on Other Planets

Driving on Other Planets

BeamNG.drive is known for its ability to simulate vehicle dynamics and crashes with impressive accuracy. In addition to weather conditions, it can also replicate gravitational forces. In this clip from The Action Lab, he shows off what might happen if you tried to drive a pickup truck on the Moon, Jupiter, and even the Sun.

Making Sci-fi Laser Beams

Making Sci-fi Laser Beams

Real laser beams don’t behave like they do in science fiction. Instead of firing in short blasts, they appear as a single coherent beam of light. The Action Lab shows a simple way to achieve the sci-fi effect in camera using a spinning fan blade and by taking advantage of a digital camera’s rolling shutter effect.

Fixing the Mythbusters’ Water Stun Gun

Fixing the Mythbusters’ Water Stun Gun

Allen Pan is a big Mythbusters fan – but he thinks they got one of their experiments wrong. In 2008 Adam, Jamie, and Grant attempted to create a stun gun that shoots electricity through water and failed. Allen came up with a different approach, playing with laminar flow to keep power flowing through two streams of water.

Enter Gloveman

Enter Gloveman

The main riff from Metallica’s Enter Sandman isn’t that hard to play on an electric guitar. But it’s much trickier to hold a pick and get the fret positions right while wearing rubber gloves. JMAPMUSIC wanted to see how many pairs of gloves he could wear before the song became unrecognizable.

Making More Dangerous Toys

Making More Dangerous Toys

Not long ago, The Backyard Scientist and his pals built a series of dangerous toys. This time, he’s replicated a few toys kids could actually buy, including ones that could strangle you, scramble your brains, and break bones. The highlight: a gas-powered pogo stick that got banned after one year on the market.

ADVERTISEMENT
Next »

Home | About | Suggest | Contact | Team | Links | Privacy | Disclosure
Advertise | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Sites We Like

Awesome Stuff: The Awesomer | Gadgets, Games & Geeks: Technabob | Cool Cars: 95Octane
Site Design & Content © 2008-2022 Awesomer Media / The Awesomer™
Visit our Friends at: Not Always Right