THE BEST Experiments

X-Ray + Hydraulic Press

X-Ray + Hydraulic Press

Lauri and Anni of Hydraulic Press Channel fame dropped by the X-ray laboratory at the University of Helsinki to see what objects look like when crushed in front of an X-ray camera. With the help of scientist Samuli Siltanen, they were able to capture some very unique images. We’d love to see some more complicated objects.

Floating an Anvil

Floating an Anvil

You’d think it would be pretty difficult to get a 110-pound iron anvil to float on top of a liquid, but it’s definitely possible with the right substance. In this clip from Cody’s Lab, he shows how a tub filled with shiny liquid mercury does the trick. The much higher density of the mercury is why this experiment works.

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Molten Aluminum Volcano

Molten Aluminum Volcano

The Backyard Scientist performs yet another very dangerous experiment, as he pours a bucket of 1500ºF molten aluminum into a volcano made from sand, then ups the spectacle by adding some fireworks to the mix. Yeah, don’t ever try anything this guy does at home.

Unmelting Things

Unmelting Things

The folks from Let’s Melt This undo some of the wanton destruction they’ve shared over the years by playing back a series of their clips in reverse. We’re still partial to the jawbreaker. Also, who knew you could melt a sock?

Is Back to the Future Survivable?

Is Back to the Future Survivable?

There’s a lot of stuff that happens to Marty and Doc in Back to the Future, from being blown away by a giant amplifier, to acting as a conductor for a lightning bolt. Jake Roper of Vsauce3 decided to find out if it would be remotely possible to live through all that in this episode of Could You Survive the Movies?

Bending Light at Home

Bending Light at Home

If you thought the only way to bend a beam of light was with mirrors, you’d be wrong. MEL Chemistry shows off a few simple experiments you can do with a laser pointer and household items like oil, water, and salt, that demonstrate the nature of reflection and refraction. More here.

How Strong Are Bricks?

How Strong Are Bricks?

The Hydraulic Press Channel previously tested the strength of LEGO bricks. Now they’re here to do the same, but with the actual construction material used to hold up real world structures. Both red solid clay bricks and concrete blocks are able to withstand an extreme amount of pressure before failing spectacularly.

Liquid Fire vs. Glass in Slow-Mo

Liquid Fire vs. Glass in Slow-Mo

The Slow Mo Guys performed a dangerous experiment, in which they tossed a flaming bucket of gasoline onto a sheet of glass to see how it spread. The resulting 4K visuals are spectacular, but under no circumstances should you try to replicate this at home.

Flamethrower vs. Aerogel

Flamethrower vs. Aerogel

Aerogel has some amazing properties. It’s insanely lightweight, and is an incredible insulator. Recently, Derek Muller of Veritasium put this to the test, by standing behind a blanket infused with silica aerogel being hit by a Boring Company Not a Flamethrower. Now we’d like to see the same test with a serious flamethrower.

Getting Cold

Getting Cold

Macrophotography experts Beauty of Science captured incredible close-up footage of the interactions between water, ice, vinegar, and other substances to demonstrate endothermic processes in front of a high-resolution thermal camera. If you haven’t seen Getting Hot, it’s worth a watch too.

Gallium in Slow-Motion

Gallium in Slow-Motion

“It’s like a cross between silver and milk.” Gallium is a pretty amazing element, a shiny metal that melts above 85.57ºF. The Slow Mo Guys decided to play with some of the stuff in front of their high-speed camera, capturing some amazing footage of the metal’s properties when in motion.

Magnetic Balls vs Monster Magnets

Magnetic Balls vs Monster Magnets

Magnet enthusiast Magnetic Games decided to see what would happen when he introduced a bunch of his small, Buckyballs-style spheres to some of his incredibly powerful neodymium monolith magnets. The impacts are quite spectacular, and especially neat to watch in slow motion.

Making a Chair from Spray Foam

Making a Chair from Spray Foam

That expanding spray foam insulation can be really useful for filling gaps and cracks, but it’s also really nasty stuff. The King of Random decided to see if they could use a bunch of cans of Great Stuff to make usable (and really ugly) furniture. Somebody should try and build a house out of this goo.

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Making a Colorful Rainstorm

Making a Colorful Rainstorm

The guys at MEL Science show off a visually impressive, but simple to execute experiment about fluid density and immiscibility. You too can make it rain colorful droplets inside of a glass with some water, vegetable oil, and food coloring. Detailed instructions here.

World’s Largest Jello Pool

World’s Largest Jello Pool

The idea of filling a swimming pool with gelatin seems simple enough, but as engineer Mark Rober explains, it’s way more complicated than you might think. Leave it to a rocket scientist to figure out how to boil and then refrigerate an entire pool filled with 15 tons of Jello.

Battery Train Races

Battery Train Races

One of the more entertaining science experiments involves slapping neodymium magnets on a AA battery, and placing it into an length of copper wire. Mr. Michal plays with the idea, using a loop of wire to see how long batteries last, then drag races them to see which is most energetic.

Steel Wool + Liquid Oxygen

Steel Wool + Liquid Oxygen

Steel wool is really useful for scrubbing and cleaning. But it’s also incredibly flammable. The guys from The King of Random decided to play with fire, and see how it might react if a lit piece of the shredded metal was dropped into a cup of styrofoam filled with liquid oxygen.

Lava in a Swimming Pool

Lava in a Swimming Pool

The Backyard Scientist doesn’t have a volcano around his house, but still wanted to play around with some molten lava. So he got to simulating the stuff by melting down some lava rock and then poured it into his parent’s swimming pool to see how it would behave.

Making Black Fire

Making Black Fire

Most fire is orange, or maybe shades of yellow, white or blue. But it turns out if you spray sodium salts and ethanol into a flame and then view it in front of a sodium vapor lamp, it looks black. Natasha Simons of The Royal Institution explains the science behind this phenomenon.

Hydraulic Press vs. Rims

Hydraulic Press vs. Rims

The Hydraulic Press Channel uses its powerful machine to conduct an interesting scientific experiment. They loaded it up with both aluminum alloy and steel car wheels to see which type is stronger, and how they behaved under extreme forces.

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Making a Mega Microwave Oven

Making a Mega Microwave Oven

The Backyard Scientist is back with his latest build – a ridiculous microwave oven, cobbled together from the magnetrons from multiple ovens. He even tried microwaving a microwave with it. We’re just going to say this is a really bad idea.

The Lost Wallet Honesty Test

The Lost Wallet Honesty Test

Engineer and inventor Mark Rober recently lost his wallet, and he never got it back. But was that an isolated incident, or are there still honest people in America’s cities? Mark decided to find out by dropping 200 wallets in 20 cities to see to gather some data on human behavior.

Microwaving Steel Wool

Microwaving Steel Wool

This super-fine steel wool reminds us of Donald Trump’s hair. But these skinny metal strands are most interesting when they have their electrons excited by a microwave oven. Steve Mould explains why it behaves so spectactularly. The 9-volt battery trick is pretty neat too.

Making a Hot Tub from Ice

Making a Hot Tub from Ice

When they’re not crushing things with their hydraulic press, Lauri and Anni are fooling around in the snowy countryside of Finland. This week, they managed to create a single-person hot tub made entirely from ice. The color of that hot water is more than a bit sketchy.

Can You Unwhip Cream?

Can You Unwhip Cream?

Theoretically, the reason that whipped cream is thick is because of the air in it. So if you put it in a vacuum chamber and remove all the air, does it go back to the way it was? The King of Random sucks as hard as they can to answer the question none of us was asking.

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