THE BEST Engineering

The World of Microscopic Machines

The World of Microscopic Machines

Did you know that the smartphone in your pocket has moving parts inside of it? Devices such as accelerometers use a hybrid of mechanical and electronic mechanisms known as MEMS. New Mind puts this fascinating and complex tech under the microscope to explain how they work, and how they’re made.

The Octo-Bouncer

The Octo-Bouncer

Electron Dust shows off a nifty machine that can bounce a ping pong ball, while keeping it balanced and centered on its moving platform. It uses combination of open-source image processing software and Arduino-controlled stepper motors to work its magic. More build details here.

Advertisement

How an Oscillating Fan Works

How an Oscillating Fan Works

Over the years, we’ve broken at least a couple of those oscillating fans, but could never figure out how to fix them. Jared Owen’s insightful 3D animation could have been a big help, as he shows us exactly how its mechanisms work to keep it moving from side to side.

How Escalators Work

How Escalators Work

As long as we’re not carrying a heavy suitcase, we generally take the stairs when given a choice. But for those times when you feel like giving your legs a break, the escalator is quite the invention. Jared Owen provides an animated explanation of the inner workings of this engineering marvel that dates back to the mid-19th century.

Walking Bicycle 2.0

Walking Bicycle 2.0

Taking obvious inspiration from artist Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests and CARV’s earlier efforts, maker The Q fabricated himself a crazy bicycle which has no rear wheel, and instead can walk across the ground. This design appears much smoother than the one we previously saw, but by no means the fastest way to ride a bicycle.

Gluon Desktop Robotic Arm

Gluon Desktop Robotic Arm

Innfos‘ modular desktop robot is designed for scientists and hobbyists alike. Configurable with up to six axes, this robotic arm has extremely dexterous and smooth actuators can be used can be used to pick up objects up to 1kg (2.2lb), hold machining tools, or to perform other precision tasks.

What’s a Skyhook?

What’s a Skyhook?

Sending cargo and ships into space is extremely expensive and resource-intensive. But there’s an idea that’s been bandied about that would use endlessly-moving tethers to catapult ships into space from Earth’s orbit. Kurzgesagt explains how this relatively simple concept could dramatically improve space travel.

Automatic Strike Bowling Ball

Automatic Strike Bowling Ball

Smart guys Mark Rober and James Bruton show us how to game the system with engineering know-how. They recently collaborated on a special bowling ball that can consistently bowl strikes by simply leaning in the direction you want it to go after you release it down the alley.

Engineering with Origami

Engineering with Origami

While you might think that origami was exclusively an art form, engineers are taking inspiration from the paper-folding craft to create innovative designs that can shape-shift to fit objects to into smaller spaces, and enable compact mechanisms, while decreasing the number of parts used. Veritasium explains.

Nauti-Craft Marine Suspension

Nauti-Craft Marine Suspension

If you’ve ever been on a boat in choppy seas, you know how stomach-churning it can be. Nauti-Craft has developed an active suspension system similar to the one used to smooth out cars and trucks on bumpy rides. While it can’t totally cancel out waves, it does dramatically mitigate them.

Designing the Perfect Runway

Designing the Perfect Runway

While most airports have designed their runways to take advantage of wind patterns, some have less than optimal layouts for efficiency and safety. Real Engineering takes out a clean sheet of paper to explain what he thinks the ideal runway setup might look like.

Nissan ProPILOT Golf Ball

Nissan ProPILOT Golf Ball

Inspired by the ProPILOT 2.0 driver assistance tech coming to some of its cars, Nissan engineered a golf ball that drives itself to the hole once on the putting green. The ball has an internal motor and works with an overhead camera and sensors to make its way to the cup regardless of how the player hits the ball.

10 Strange Engines

10 Strange Engines

YouTuber JD Rock’s picks for the strangest engines invented or currently in development. The list includes the hypersonic harbinger SABRE, the highly scalable and versatile camless engine, and the mind-boggling EmDrive.

Advertisement

Restoring a Parking Meter

Restoring a Parking Meter

With the advent of pay stations and mobile parking apps, meters are becoming a rare sight. But these coin-collecting dinosaurs still have some neat mechanical bits worth exploring inside of them, as Rescue & Restore shows when he tears down a 1960s Duncan meter and makes it like new again. That shiny red coat is a thing of beauty.

Ciari Ascender Folding Guitar

Ciari Ascender Folding Guitar

Musician Jonathan Spangler and luthier Joe Glaser developed this innovative electric guitar that features a folding neck. Thanks to its ingenious mechanism, it can fit under an airplane seat, but still offers performance-quality play when unfolded. Register your interest in buying one on the Ciari website.

Marble Machine X Plays Drums

Marble Machine X Plays Drums

From the looks of things, musician, and instrument designer Wintergatan has nearly completed the build of his long-in-progress follow up to his original marble machine. After showing us the amazing marble elevator, he’s ready to play some percussion with the intricate contraption.

How a Pull-back Toy Car Works

How a Pull-back Toy Car Works

Ever wonder how the mechanism in those toy cars work so you simply pull them back, and then they zoom forward? Explainer of things Jared Owen’s animation shows us the inner workings of these spring-powered cars and how they store and release energy.

3D Printed Shape-shifters

3D Printed Shape-shifters

Engineers from MIT have developed 3D-printed objects with embedded magnetic particles that allow them to change shapes in an instant. The current prototypes are mere playthings, but the tech could give way to tiny, remote-controlled medical devices.

The Engineering of Droplets

The Engineering of Droplets

The Engineer Guy explains how droplets form. It happens when fluid is allowed to drip such that it takes a form with the smallest surface area – a sphere. By vibrating the fluid’s container, one can control how fast droplets form. This knowledge is used in printing, painting, and even medical applications.

BarrelMover 5000

BarrelMover 5000

One of the more dangerous jobs in the world is that of a highway construction worker, so anything that can improve their safety is worth a look. The BarrelMover 5000 is an ingeniously simple invention, capable of moving barrels while keeping workers safely inside a vehicle.

Advertisement

TossingBot

TossingBot

Engineers from Princeton University and Google Brain Robotics show off a pair of robotic arms which work together with custom algorithms to toss and catch small objects. Machine learning allows the system to quickly figure out how to toss new objects accurately.

MIT Mini Cheetah Robot

MIT Mini Cheetah Robot

Engineers from MIT’s Biomimetic Robotics Lab show off a small version of their cheetah-inspired robot that can not only run, sidestep, and balance itself better than just about any ‘bot we’ve seen, but it can do backflips, and right itself if knocked down.

Festo BionicSoftHand

Festo BionicSoftHand

Robotics firm Festo shows off its impressive design for a pneumatic hand with flexible fingers that can grip things like humans do. It uses AI tech to learn to grasp objects, and has sensors to help it model the shape of the object it’s holding.

Reconfigurable Wheel-Tracks

Reconfigurable Wheel-Tracks

For a DARPA tech demo, CMU National Robotics Engineering Center developed wheels which can transform back and forth between round and triangular shapes instantly, with tank-like grip on soft surfaces in track mode, and a more conventional ride in wheel mode.

Coil Wrapping Machine

Coil Wrapping Machine

A wonderfully satisfying bit of engineering wizardry. What you’re looking at is a specialized industrial machine which spins a roll of plastic wrap around a freshly-milled steel coil until it’s fully protected for shipment. Here’s a slightly more sleepy look at a similar machine.

ADVERTISEMENT

Use Arrow Keys ← → for Faster Navigation

Home | About | Suggest | Contact | Team | Links | Privacy | Disclosure
Advertise | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Sites We Like

Awesome Stuff: The Awesomer | Gadgets, Games & Geeks: Technabob | Cool Cars: 95Octane
Site Design & Content © 2008-2019 Awesomer Media / The Awesomer™
Visit our Friends at: Not Always Right