Awesome Electromechanical

Toxic on Toothbrushes

Toxic on Toothbrushes

There’s no escape; I can’t wait. The exceptional electromechanical Device Orchestra is back to perform another pop music hit. This time, the band of electric toothbrushes, credit card terminals, and typewriters were joined by an Epilator hair remover which added a spinny new sound to the Britney Spears track Toxic.

Self-Playing Guitar “Robot”

Self-Playing Guitar “Robot”

Musician Demin Vladimir created this electromechanical rig plays an acoustic guitar. It has one set of actuators that hold the frets while others strum the strings. It’s not the most expressive instrument, but neither were vintage player pianos, and we still love those. He’s also built an accordion that plays the notes itself.

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Playing Card Flip Clock

Playing Card Flip Clock

We’re suckers for electromechanical displays like those airport boards and flip clocks. Maker Shinsaku Hiura created an unusual take on the idea by replacing the usual digits with numbered playing cards. Mechanically, it works like other flip clocks, but this one shows the time on top and the bottom half displays card backs.

Running Up That Hill on the Electro-Dulcimer

Running Up That Hill on the Electro-Dulcimer

It’s no Floppotron 3.0, but DJthefirst’s self-playing electromechanical dulcimer has got some serious soul. Put your headphones on, crank up the volume, hit play, and enjoy this soothing rendition of the Kate Bush track Running up That Hill (A Deal with God).

I Want to Break Free on Floppy Disks

I Want to Break Free on Floppy Disks

The recently upgraded Floppotron 3.0 is here to show off just how much better it sounds now that it has more than 500 floppy drives at its core. The precision-orchestrated machines channel Freddie Mercury, Brian May, Roger Taylor, and John Deacon with aplomb with a cover of the 1984 track I Want to Break Free.

Don’t Stop Me Now on Devices

Don’t Stop Me Now on Devices

It might not have 512 floppy drives, but the Device Orchestra has plenty of heart (and googly eyes). So crank up the volume, and get your day started right with a performance of Queen’s Don’t Stop Me Now that will have you buzzing like an electric toothbrush.

Floppotron Is Dead, Long Live Floppotron

Floppotron Is Dead, Long Live Floppotron

It was just yesterday that we paid our respects to Floppotron 2.0. As we hoped, Paweł Zadrożniak was at work building an even bigger and better electromechanical band. Floppotron 3.0 has 512 floppy disk drives, 16 hard disks, and four flatbed scanners for a richer and fuller sound than its predecessors.

Farewell to Floppotron 2.0

Farewell to Floppotron 2.0

Paweł Zadrożniak’s electromechanical orchestra has entertained millions with over 120 covers of popular songs. Now, the Floppotron 2.0 is being retired, and Paweł is sending it off with a performance of Andrea Bocelli’s Con Te Partirò, and there’s not a dry eye in the house. We’re hoping he’s just making room for Floppotron 3.0.

Gyre

Gyre

Yunchul Kim created this kinetic sculpture which looks like some sort of segmented alien robot. The work represents the infinite nature of creation and extinction, with each of its parts made from acrylic, flexible LED panels, and motors. It’s on display at the 59th International Art Exhibition in Venice, Italy through 11.27.22.

How a Split-Flap Display Works

How a Split-Flap Display Works

Split-flap displays used to be common in everything from tabletop clocks to arrival and departure boards at airports. While not as popular these days, these electro-mechanical displays are still marvels of engineering. Scottbez1 walks us through how they work with a demonstration of his single-digit Arduino-controlled display.

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