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Chemistry

Chemistry Lab Shot Glasses

Chemistry Lab Shot Glasses
$20/set  Buy Comment

Barbuzzo’s miniature replicas of laboratory glassware are the perfect way to serve up the results of your mixology experiments. The set includes all four glasses shown here, each one labeled with volume demarcations for precise measurements.

Making Black Fire

Making Black Fire

Most fire is orange, or maybe shades of yellow, white or blue. But it turns out if you spray sodium salts and ethanol into a flame and then view it in front of a sodium vapor lamp, it looks black. Natasha Simons of The Royal Institution explains the science behind this phenomenon.

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Making Flaming Snowballs

Making Flaming Snowballs

After creating a mix of chilled acetone and water that was both slushy and flammable, The King of Random tried to make fiery snowballs using a similar technique. After a few false starts, he succeeded with gasoline-soaked snowballs. Kids, don’t try this at home.

When Mercury Meets Aluminum

When Mercury Meets Aluminum

While most aluminum is covered with a protective oxide layer, it’s possible that it could wear away over time. After watching NileRed’s clip showing how mercury can interact with exposed aluminum, we’re more than happy with it being banned from air travel.

Self-Siphoning Fluid

Self-Siphoning Fluid

The Action Lab shows off a cool property of polyethylene glycol, a chemical with a crazy high molecular weight. As a result, they stick together in very long chains, so once he pours out a little bit of the liquid, the rest follows on its own, much like metal beads do.

Fun with Liquid Metal

Fun with Liquid Metal

The Backyard Scientist takes a look at an interesting property of the liquid metal substance gallium when it’s mixed with water and sulfuric acid. The metal turns into perfectly round beads, then coalesces with an almost magnetic force due to surface tension.

The Floor Is on Fire

The Floor Is on Fire

A chemistry teacher demonstrates a really cool property of liquid methane by pouring the rapidly-extinguishing substance onto the floor while afire. We’re not sure how safe this is, but it sure looks cool. Original video here.

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