Awesome Biology

The Fart Limit

The Fart Limit

It turns out most of the stuff that comes out of your butt when you pass gas is odorless. Michael from Vsauce explains the 1% that makes farts stink, and the theoretical possibilities if your body emitted much more of that noxious stuff.

The Science of Pain

The Science of Pain

Few things in life are worse than suffering from severe pain. But as this clip from TED-Ed points out, our sense of pain can act in some truly mysterious ways, sometimes even triggering solely from thinking that we’ve been injured.

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The Fantastic Feet of the Microcosmos

The Fantastic Feet of the Microcosmos

Unless you’re a snake or a fish, there’s a pretty good chance you have legs and feet. Journey to the Microcosmos gets up close and personal with microorganisms to look at how they get around using their tiny feet and other moving appendages.

Your Screen Is Covered in Human Blood

Your Screen Is Covered in Human Blood

If that title doesn’t get your attention, we don’t know what will. In this video from Journey to the Microcosmos, they get up close and personal with a flowing river of human blood cells. It’s amazing to see how the individual cells dancing about and to learn about the characteristics of blood that keep us alive.

True Facts About Tardigrades

True Facts About Tardigrades

Tardigrades may only measure about 0.5mm long, but these teensy water-dwelling critters are some of the toughest organisms known to humankind, having survived exposure to nuclear radiation and the vacuum of space. Zefrank provides an in-depth look at these strange, see-through dudes and what makes them tick.

DNA My Dog Breed Identification and Genetic Screening

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Curious to know what breeds are in your dog’s DNA? This test not only will give you that information with 99.97% accuracy but can also provide details on their genetics and any health risks they may face. Just want to know your dog’s breed and age? There’s a less expensive kit for that. Save 20% in The Awesomer Shop.

Human Anatomy Jigsaw Puzzles

Human Anatomy Jigsaw Puzzles
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This series of three jigsaw puzzles come together to form the major anatomical structures of a 5-foot-tall human being. Choose from head, thorax, or abdominal sections, each certified for accuracy by medical illustrator Mesa Schumacher. They make a great gift for biology students, or just anyone interested in science.

How Disney Parks Fool Us with Forced Perspective

How Disney Parks Fool Us with Forced Perspective

If you’ve ever visited one of Disney’s theme parks, you have been tricked. The parks frequently employ an optical illusion known as forced perspective to make structures look bigger or smaller than they actually are. Art of Engineering explains the trickery and why our brains get so easily fooled by it.

The World’s Largest Living Organism

The World’s Largest Living Organism

Conventional wisdom might lead you to believe that the largest living thing on Earth was some kind of whale. But scientists say there’s something much larger, and it’s land-locked in the middle of Utah. Alex Rosenthal of TED-Ed digs into the story of Pando, what caused it to become so enormous, and the risks it now faces.

Why Are Cat Claws So Sharp?

Why Are Cat Claws So Sharp?

If you’ve ever gotten gored by your adorable little kitty cat’s hook-like claws, you know how sharp they can be. Science educator Kyle Hill explains the biology behind cat claws, what makes them different from our fingernails, and how they manage to stay so razor-sharp.

The Microcosm in Glass

The Microcosm in Glass

Using high-precision digital models and laser etching techniques, CinkS labs is creating a series of glass cubes which display intricate 3D images of viruses, bacteria, and cells. The crystal cubes come in 3cm, 7cm, and 10cm sizes, as well as an 8cm sphere. And yes, they even have a COVID-19 model.

Why Are You Alive?

Why Are You Alive?

Even when you’re sound asleep, there are billions of processes going on inside of your body. Kurzgesagt explores the forces, energy sources, and organic compounds at work that keep us alive and ticking, despite the universe’s tendency towards entropy.

In the Next 60 Seconds

In the Next 60 Seconds

The human body is an amazing organic machine that performs countless tasks every minute of every day. In this video from The Infographics Show, they tally up some of the things that your body will do in the next minute – or twice as much while you watch the entire 2 minute clip.

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Stuff That… Isn’t

Stuff That… Isn’t

Did you know that most bees don’t have yellow and black stripes, or that most Christmas trees aren’t pine trees? MinuteEarth sets the facts straight on four very different subjects where we thought things were one way, but aren’t.

Why Honeybees Love Hexagons

Why Honeybees Love Hexagons

If you’ve ever seen a beehive up close, you know how its made up of hundreds of nearly perfect hexagonal cells. Why is that, and how do bees know how to make such perfect geometry? TED-Ed provides a brief explanation of this strange intersection of evolutionary biology and architecture.

Engineering Living Robots

Engineering Living Robots

Researchers from The University of Vermont and Tufts University have created tiny “xenobots,” which use living cells manipulated to perform tasks. AI algorithms guided the microsurgery used to create these organic machines which could someday clean microplastics from oceans, or repair organs in our bodies.

7 Million Years of Human Evolution

7 Million Years of Human Evolution

Want to know about our genetic ancestors? American Museum of Natural History’s fascinating video takes us back to the moment where humans branched off from chimpanzees, and illustrates our progress via maps of significant archaeological discoveries.

Journey to the Microcosmos

Journey to the Microcosmos

This new channel is a collaboration by SciShow host Hank Green, musician Andrew Huang, and microorganism enthusiast James Weiss. It delves deep into the world of the trillions of microscopic organisms that surround us. We recommend starting off with Meet the Microcosmos for a primer to this fascinating universe.

Tiny Bombs in Your Blood

Tiny Bombs in Your Blood

Kurzgesagt once again dives deep within our bodies, this time to explore the complement system, a part of our immune system which can activate to help defend us from disease, but that also needs to be kept in check to keep from destroying us from the inside.

Can You Sneeze Your Eyeballs Out?

Can You Sneeze Your Eyeballs Out?

There’s an oft-repeated story among school children that if you managed to keep your eyeballs open while sneezing, that they’d pop right out of their sockets. SciShow digs into this little gem to see if there’s any reason to actually be worried the next time you let out an atchoo.

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The Worst Animal Skeletons

The Worst Animal Skeletons

(PG-13: Language) When you think of it, the skeletons of all creatures are a little weird looking, but some are definitely weirder than others. Tune in to this lesson from the Sam O’Nella Academy and enjoy 10 of the worst bone designs that mother nature has bestowed upon the world.

Is Meat Bad for You?

Is Meat Bad for You?

You might think that mammals always ate meat, but it turns out it was an evolutionary necessity due to changes in Earth’s climate. Kurzgesagt explores whether or not this change in our diets was actually good for us, or if eating meat truly has a negative impact on our health.

Simulating Natural Selection

Simulating Natural Selection

We wouldn’t be here on this planet if it weren’t for evolution – and a big part of the evolutionary process is natural selection. Primer presents a great 10 minute lesson on how the whole “survival of the fittest” thing works, along with a visual simulation with little blobby creatures.

Reverse Engineering Fossils

Reverse Engineering Fossils

Using computer modeling and robotics, scientists are attempting to replicate the movements of creatures who have long been extinct. Nature video shows us how they brought back the Orobates pabsti – a crocodile-like animal who lived before the dinosaurs.

Why Are Your Fingerprints Unique?

Why Are Your Fingerprints Unique?

Fingerprints have been used as a reliable method of personal identification for over 500 years. MinuteEarth provides a brief explanation about what makes each of our digits different, and why it’s basically impossible for two to ever be the same.

It’s Okay to Fart

It’s Okay to Fart

It’s Okay to Be Smart’s first ever rhyming video title takes us inside the gasses inside of our digestive systems, schooling us on the reasons flatulence happens, how some animals take advantage of them, why farts smell, and why we find them funny.

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