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Biology

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7 Million Years of Human Evolution

7 Million Years of Human Evolution

Want to know about our genetic ancestors? American Museum of Natural History’s fascinating video takes us back to the moment where humans branched off from chimpanzees, and illustrates our progress via maps of significant archaeological discoveries.

Journey to the Microcosmos

Journey to the Microcosmos

This new channel is a collaboration by SciShow host Hank Green, musician Andrew Huang, and microorganism enthusiast James Weiss. It delves deep into the world of the trillions of microscopic organisms that surround us. We recommend starting off with Meet the Microcosmos for a primer to this fascinating universe.

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In the Next 60 Seconds

In the Next 60 Seconds

The human body is an amazing organic machine that performs countless tasks every minute of every day. In this video from The Infographics Show, they tally up some of the things that your body will do in the next minute – or twice as much while you watch the entire 2 minute clip.

Tiny Bombs in Your Blood

Tiny Bombs in Your Blood

Kurzgesagt once again dives deep within our bodies, this time to explore the complement system, a part of our immune system which can activate to help defend us from disease, but that also needs to be kept in check to keep from destroying us from the inside.

Can You Sneeze Your Eyeballs Out?

Can You Sneeze Your Eyeballs Out?

There’s an oft-repeated story among school children that if you managed to keep your eyeballs open while sneezing, that they’d pop right out of their sockets. SciShow digs into this little gem to see if there’s any reason to actually be worried the next time you let out an atchoo.

The Worst Animal Skeletons

The Worst Animal Skeletons

(PG-13: Language) When you think of it, the skeletons of all creatures are a little weird looking, but some are definitely weirder than others. Tune in to this lesson from the Sam O’Nella Academy and enjoy 10 of the worst bone designs that mother nature has bestowed upon the world.

Is Meat Bad for You?

Is Meat Bad for You?

You might think that mammals always ate meat, but it turns out it was an evolutionary necessity due to changes in Earth’s climate. Kurzgesagt explores whether or not this change in our diets was actually good for us, or if eating meat truly has a negative impact on our health.

The Science of Pain

The Science of Pain

There are few things in life that are worse than suffering from severe pain. But as this clip from TED-Ed points out, our sense of pain can act in some truly mysterious ways, sometimes even triggering solely from thinking that we’re injured.

Simulating Natural Selection

Simulating Natural Selection

We wouldn’t be here on this planet if it weren’t for evolution – and a big part of the evolutionary process is natural selection. Primer presents a great 10 minute lesson on how the whole “survival of the fittest” thing works, along with a visual simulation with little blobby creatures.

Reverse Engineering Fossils

Reverse Engineering Fossils

Using computer modeling and robotics, scientists are attempting to replicate the movements of creatures who have long been extinct. Nature video shows us how they brought back the Orobates pabsti – a crocodile-like animal who lived before the dinosaurs.

Why Are Your Fingerprints Unique?

Why Are Your Fingerprints Unique?

Fingerprints have been used as a reliable method of personal identification for over 500 years. MinuteEarth provides a brief explanation about what makes each of our digits different, and why it’s basically impossible for two to ever be the same.

It’s Okay to Fart

It’s Okay to Fart

It’s Okay to Be Smart’s first ever rhyming video title takes us inside the gasses inside of our digestive systems, schooling us on the reasons flatulence happens, how some animals take advantage of them, why farts smell, and why we find them funny.

Where Do Teeth Come From?

Where Do Teeth Come From?

It’s a process that almost all mammals go through – starting out toothless, then growing baby teeth, then their replacement with permanent adult teeth. It’s Okay to Be Smart explains the strange and at times creepy science behind this biological mechanism.

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Why Does Your Voice Change?

Why Does Your Voice Change?

We all know that boys’ voices get deeper as they go through puberty, but hormones aren’t the only process in play as our voices evolve. TED-Ed educator Shaylin A. Schundler explains how other physical changes affect the sound of our voices as we get older.

Why Water Up Your Nose Hurts

Why Water Up Your Nose Hurts

Ever wonder why it stings and feels so uncomfortable if you get water up your nose? SciShow explains how the warm and salty environs of your sinuses don’t care for the cool and fresh water found in most swimming pools.

Kurzgesagt: Life & Size Pt. 2

Kurzgesagt: Life & Size Pt. 2

Kurzgesagt wraps up 2017 with a follow up to its fascinating clip about the relationship between an organism’s size and the way it evolves. This time out, we learn how we might actually explode if we weren’t the size we were meant to be. Say, was that Barb at 1:30?

You Have More Than Five Senses

You Have More Than Five Senses

Sight, smell, touch, taste, hearing. We’ve had it engrained our whole lives that those are THE five human senses, but there are many other things we can detect that don’t tie to an obvious sensory organ. Vox delves into some of our abilities which didn’t make the short list.

The Killer Bacteria That Gave Us Life

The Killer Bacteria That Gave Us Life

We’re sure that we’re oversimplifying in our headline, but we’ll let TED-Ed and molecular biologist Anusuya Willis explain how the single-celled cyanobacteria which nearly wiped out most life on Earth, then gave us the oxygen and plants we all need to exist.

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